text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 10-105
Researchers Discover Relative of Best-Known Human Ancestor

Famed hominid "Lucy" no longer alone

Back to article | Note about images

Photo a small fragment of the lower arm bone of A. afarensis.

Researchers recovered only the second partial skeleton of science's best-known early human ancestor, Australopithecus afarensis. It's 400,000 years older than the famed hominid "Lucy," which is the same species, and it's male. Here, a small fragment of the specimen's lower arm bone is shown.

Credit: Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Cleveland Museum of Natural History


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.6 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Curator and Head of Physical Anthropology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, discusses the discovery and significance of "Kadanuumuu."

Credit: Cleveland Museum of Natural History

 

Photo of Yohannes Haile-Selassie excavating an A. afarensis rib from the Korsi Dora locality.

Excavations between 2005 and 2008 in the Korsi Dora locality of the Woranso-Mille Project in Ethiopia uncovered an upper arm, a collarbone, neck bones, ribs, pelvis, sacrum, a thighbone, a shinbone and an adult shoulder blade. Excavations took more than five years to complete.

Credit: Woranso-Mille Project


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.4 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo showing the reconstructed skeleton of the Australopithecus afarensis Lucy.

The Australopithecus afarensis Lucy, whose partial skeleton is seen here, is thought to be ancestral to the genus Australopithecus and the genus Homo that includes modern humans.

Credit: Cleveland Museum of Natural History


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (174 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

University of California, Berkley paleontologist Tim White discusses the importance of "Lucy" in a NSF special report titled Evolution of Evolution - 150 Years of Darwin's "On the Origin of Species." His is one of three interviews in the report discussing anthropologic evolution.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page