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Press Release 10-198

NSF Awards Grants for Research on Coupled Natural and Human Systems

Mongolian rangelands and climate change, fire-prone landscapes, and invasive Spartina grasses in San Francisco Bay are among topics

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Photo of Mongolian rangelands with grazing animals.

Mongolian rangelands and their response to climate change are the topic of a CNH grant.

Credit: UN FAO


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Photo of a forest fire.

Fire-prone landscapes, more prevalent in droughts, will be studied by CNH researchers.

Credit: NASA


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Photo of Spartina grass.

Spartina grass, an invasive plant in San Francisco Bay, is the subject of an NSF CNH grant.

Credit: USGS


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Map showing land use in the midwest U.S.

CNH scientists will research the effect of climate change on midwestern U.S. heartlands.

Credit: Christopher Sant


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Photo of a grassland.

Acequias may hold answers to community resilience to climate and land-use changes.

Credit: Alexander Fernald


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Photo of the sediment laden Mississippi River on left and Gulf of Mexico on the right.

Sediment flows from the Miss. River into the Gulf of Mexico, where "dead zones" form.

Credit: Nancy Rabalais, LUMCON


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