text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 10-228
What Can Ice Reveal About Fire?

Carbon monoxide trapped in ice cores reveals unexpected trends regarding burning biomass

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of the drill site D47 in Antarctica.

General view of the drill site D47 in Antarctica where the LGGE (Laboratoire du Glaciologie et Geophysique de l'Environnement) team drilled one of two cores used in the recent Southern Hemisphere biomass-burning study. The thermal drilling method the researchers used allowed them to collect a 12-centimeter-diameter core, from which carbon monoxide and its isotopes were measured at Stony Brook University. These analyses required close to one kilogram of ice per sample.

Credit: Jerome Chappellaz, CNRS/LGGE.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (167 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Image of the Dec. 3, 2010 Science cover.

The researchers' findings are described online in the Dec. 2, 2010 Science Express.

Credit: copyright AAAS 2010


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.4 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page