text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 10-234
Human Networking Theory Gives Picture of Infectious Disease Spread

High school students' interactions provide new look at disease transmission

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of a woman blowing her nose into tissue.

Colds and flu spread like wildfire through groups of people, and through populations. Why?

Credit: Kristen Devlin


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (36 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Cartoon entitled Foil the Flu depicting a man poking a needle into a virus.

Researchers are continually seeking new ways to foil flu and other infectious diseases.

Credit: NIH


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (64 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of a matchbox-sized sensor device that records disease-spreading interactions.

Matchbox-sized sensor devices called motes recorded disease-spreading interactions.

Credit: Katrina Voss


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (27 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of a man with a cold with a pile of tissues in front of him.

Stand back: if you're in a crowded room, you may soon be awash in viruses--and tissues.

Credit: NIH


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (71 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Illustration of the flu virus and its antibodies.

Graphic showing the flu virus and its antibodies.

Credit: NIH


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (101 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Illustration showing how a flu virus transforms and spreads.

Antigenic shift: how a flu virus transforms and spreads.

Credit: NIH


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (192 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page