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Press Release 11-009
Scientists: Big City Life May Alter Green Attitudes

Study of Chinese citizens says jobs more important than salary when it comes to pro-environmental behavior

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of Shanghai waterside.

New research from Michigan State University's Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability shows that employees who work for large companies in China--especially the workplace leaders--engage in environmentally friendly behavior the most. They tend to sort trash and participate in environmental litigation more than those who are unemployeed or who are not workplace leaders.

Credit: 2011 Jupiterimages Corporation

 

Michigan State University sustainability scientist Jianguo "Jack" Liu discusses green behavior in China's big cities and he explains what the United States should learn from his recent study.

Credit: NSF

 

Photo showing large numbers of people and vehicles on Shanghai street and hazy, overcast sky.

Because China's rapid economic growth is likely to continue, China will provides a setting where U.S. researchers and decision makers can learn much about the ways to sustain both environmental quality and economic prosperity.

Credit: 2011 Jupiterimages Corporation

 

Photo of Great Wall of China near Beijing obscured by air pollution, dust and sand.

Air pollution caused by burning of fossil fuels, dust and sand particles obscure the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall of China near Beijing.

Credit: Steve Lonker


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (509 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of a coal power plant in Xian, China releasing sulfur dioxide directly into the atmosphere.

China's carbon dioxide emissions are ranked number one in the world and only about 4 percent of China's cities have a highest air quality rating. Here, a coal power plant in Xian, China does not have air pollution control devices such as sulfur dioxide scrubber systems. It releases sulfur dioxide directly into the atmosphere.

Credit: Steve Lonker


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (171 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



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