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New NSF Engineering Research Center Plans to Transform Urban Water Systems

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Image of an infiltration testbed with instruments to assess groundwater recharge and recovery.

This infiltration test best is instrumented to assess groundwater recharge and recovery. Researchers from the NSF ERC for Re-inventing America's Urban Water Infrastructure will study the geophysical and bio-geochemical processes affecting both water storage and water quality.

Credit: Rosemary J. Knight, Stanford University, Department of Geophysics


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Image of three interdisciplinary researchers discussing lab results.

Interdisciplinary teams across the ERC campuses will assess the removal of trace contaminants in reclaimed water, while educating future engineers and planners to better understand potential economic, social, and policy solutions involving water reuse.

Credit: Richard G. Luthy, Stanford University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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Image of a wetland testbed where ERC research will see how natural and engineered systems interact.

Research at a wetland testbed in Discovery Bay, near San Francisco, Calif., will help achieve the ERC vision of how natural systems may work together with engineered systems to improve water quality, enhance ecosystems, and improve urban aesthetics.

Credit: David L. Sedlak, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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Image of a distributed water reclamation system in Golden, Colo.

At this testbed in Golden, Colo., engineering researchers will remotely operate a distributed water reclamation system to produce tailored water quality on demand in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable manner.

Credit: Jörg E. Drewes, Colorado School of Mines, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering


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