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Press Release 11-163
Stick-On Tattoos Go Electric

Micro-electronics, elegant design and existing tattoo tech combine to create a complex device that is far more than a novelty

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The newly developed device, an epidermal electronic system.

The newly developed device, an epidermal electronic system created by an international team of engineers and scientists.

Credit: J. Rogers, University of Illinois


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On August 10, 2011, NSF interviewed University of Illinois professor John Rogers about a novel electronic tattoo.

Credit: NSF

 

Northwestern University professor Yonggang Huang describes how he and his collaborators developed the new electronic tattoo.

Credit: NSF

 

One of the advantages of the newly created epidermal electronic systems is easy on / easy off application. As this video shows, the electronics have the right physical propertie--such as stiffness, bending rigidity, thickness and mass density--to perfectly match to the epidermis. The systems seamlessly integrate and conform to the surface of the skin in a way that is mechanically invisible to the user, and the devices have the potential to provide a range of healthcare and non-healthcare related functions.

Credit: J. Rogers, University of Illinois

 

A newly developed stick-on tattoo with integrated sensor technology, prior to application.

A newly developed stick-on tattoo with integrated sensor technology, prior to application (from reverse).

Credit: J. Rogers, University of Illinois


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When compressed and pulled, the epidermal electronics device conforms with the skin.

When compressed and pulled, the epidermal electronics device conforms with the skin, remaining in place and intact.

Credit: J. Rogers, University of Illinois


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The undulating wiring design, which enables electronics strength and flexibility.

The undulating wiring developed by the research teams which enables electronics strength and flexibility despite small size.

Credit: J. Rogers, University of Illinois


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Cover of the August 12, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

The researchers' work is described in the August 12, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2011


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