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Press Release 11-186
NSF Announces Results of the Materials Research Centers and Teams Competition

The centers and teams support outstanding interdisciplinary materials research and education

Back to article | Note about images

Schematic of the molecular, supramolecular and macroscopic materials delivery systems of a mussel.

This image is a representation of the materials characteristics of the adhesive system of the common mussel, Mytilus edulis. Researchers at the materials research center at the University of California at Santa Barbara think that adaptations of these molecular, supramolecular and macroscopic materials delivery systems could lead to major advances in applications ranging from underwater adhesives and biocompatible coatings to medical devices.

Credit: Materials Research Laboratory at UCSB, an NSF MRSEC


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Image of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber which is used to analyze the surfaces of materials.

This image shows an ultrahigh vacuum chamber and the surrounding systems used to prepare and analyze the surfaces of materials at Yale University. The central part is a unique combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope that can operate at temperatures close to absolute zero. The combined microscope can simultaneously map out the chemical and electrical properties of surfaces at the atomic scale, while also describing the precise layout and identity of the atoms that make up the surface of the material.

Credit: Udo Schwarz, Yale University


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Artistic rendering of the metal tip of the special microscope used to map surfaces.

This image shows an artistic rendering of the metal tip of the special microscope used to perform 3D force field mapping of materials at Yale University. The microscope is a unique combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope that can operate at temperatures close to absolute zero. It can simultaneously map out the chemical and electrical properties of surfaces at the atomic scale, while also describing the precise layout and identity of the atoms that make up the surface of the material.

Credit: Udo Schwarz, Yale University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (3.6 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



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