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Press Release 11-264
Tool Enables Scientists to Uncover Patterns in Vast Data Sets

Relationships discovered in data will shed light on vexing problems and increase human understanding

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Illustration showing humans evolving to cope with growing data sets.

Evolving to copy with growing data sets, a pictoral representation.

Credit: Chi Birmingham


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Photo of David and Yakir Reshef who developed MIC.

Brothers David Reshef and Yakir Reshef developed MIC under the guidance of professors from Harvard University and the Broad Institute.

Credit: ChieYu Lin


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Illustration of a stack of paper rising above the city skyline.

What might we be missing in large datasets? If researchers printed on paper each potential relationship in a recent data set containing abundance levels of bacteria in the human gut, the stack of paper would reach to a height of 1.4 miles, 6 times the height of the Empire State Building.

Credit: Sigrid Knemeyer


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Cover of the December 16, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

The researchers' work is described in the December 16, 2011 issue of the journal Science.

Credit: Copyright AAAS 2011


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