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Press Release 12-069
Climate Change Boosts Then Quickly Stunts Plants, Decade-long Study Shows

Global warming may initially make the grass greener, but not for long

Back to article | Note about images

Photos of the studied ecosystems with increasing elevation from left to right.

Composite of the ecosystems studied, arranged left to right in order of increasing elevation.

Credit: Paul Dijkstra and Michael Allwright


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Photo of a person walking in the Great Basin Desert study site.

The Great Basin Desert study site, lowest elevation in a gradient of sites researched.

Credit: Paul Dijkstra


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Photo of a desert grassland with mountains in the background.

High desert grassland, one of several sites the scientists studied.

Credit: Paul Dijkstra


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Photo of a pinyon-juniper area with mountains in the background.

A pinyon-juniper area, next in increasing elevation of the study sites.

Credit: Paul Dijkstra


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Photo of the ponderosa pine meadow study site with two researchers taking samples.

Moving upward, the ponderosa pine meadow study site.

Credit: Michael Allwright


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (648 KB)

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Photo of a mixed conifer meadow with a researcher taking a soil sample.

The highest-elevation site, a mixed conifer meadow.

Credit: Michael Allwright


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