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Press Release 12-099

NSF Announces Six Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials Awards

Projects will investigate materials for renewable energy, advanced electronics, biomaterials, organic and polymeric materials

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Image of Howard University's NanoExpress, a mobile science theme park.

The NanoExpress, operated by Howard University, is a mobile science theme park exhibiting some of the latest science and technology at the nano dimension in a variety of disciplines. It is part of a major campaign designed to provide information on the current state of research and development in nanotechnology and this award will provide upgrades to the mobile lab's capabilities.

Credit: Nefertiti Patrick Jackson, Howard University


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Micrograph image of alpha-Zirconium phosphate micro-crystals.

Micro-crystals of alpha-Zirconium phosphate, created at the Interfaces in Materials PREM Center at Texas State University, are a source of platelets with nanometer dimensions. The micrograph image shows that the lab group has control over the platelet diameter, which is an important feature in nano-structured materials for catalysis, environmental and energy related applications.

Credit: Luyi Sun, Texas State University - San Marcos


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Image of popcorn-shaped nanoparticles, black dots, that detects a type of Salmonella bacteria.

This image shows that popcorn-shaped nanoparticles (C), developed at the Jackson State University PREM, can selectively detect a type of Salmonella bacteria. A color change indicates whether or not lettuce is contaminated with Salmonella bacteria (A) or is safe to eat (B).

Credit: Paresh C. Ray, department of chemistry & biochemistry, Jackson State University


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