text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation Home National Science Foundation - Environmental Research & Education (ERE)
Environmental Research & Education (ERE)
design element
ERE Home
About ERE
Funding Opportunities
Awards
News
Events
Discoveries
Publications
Advisory Committee
See Additional ERE Resources
View ERE Staff
Proposals and Awards
Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  Introduction
Proposal Preparation and Submission
bullet Grant Proposal Guide
  bullet Grants.gov Application Guide
Award and Administration
bullet Award and Administration Guide
Award Conditions
Other Types of Proposals
Merit Review
NSF Outreach
Policy Office
Additional ERE Resources
Follow ERE on Twitter
ERE Funding Opportunities
Other Site Features
Special Reports
Research Overviews
Multimedia Gallery
Classroom Resources
NSF-Wide Investments

Email this pagePrint this page
All Images


Press Release 12-146
Tale of Two Scientific Fields--Ecology and Phylogenetics--Offers New Views of Earth's Biodiversity

Scientists report new look at 'patterns in nature' in special issue of journal Ecology

Back to article | Note about images

Image of a pattern created by a leaf miner insect with the words Photo Gallery.

See nature's patterns in this photo gallery. They're in everything from ocean currents to a flower's petals. Scientists are taking a new look at Earth-patterns, from the biodiversity of yard plants in the U.S. to that of desert mammals in Israel. From where flowers and bees live on the Tibetan plateau to how willow trees in America's Midwest make use of water. They're finding that two fields of science--ecology and phylogenetic--are inextricably intertwined.

Credit: National Science Foundation.

 

Cover of the special issue of Ecology on the fields of ecology and phylogenetics.

A tale of two fields--ecology and phylogenetics--reported in a special issue of Ecology.

Credit: Ecological Society of America


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (3.6 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo looking up through a gap in the forest.

Trees that move into gaps in the forest are closely related.

Credit: Robin Chazdon


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (645 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Aerial photo over the Twin Cities show houses and their plant-filled yards.

Urban yards, such as those in the Twin Cities, harbor plants adapted to humans.

Credit: Regents of the University of Minnesota, with permission of the Metropolitan Design Center.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (361 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of caterpillars feeding in a forest in Peru.

Caterpillars feed in a forest in Peru: do insects have an effect on where plants live?

Credit: G. Lamarre


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (594 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of the bright yellow flowers of Burke's goldfields, found only in California's vernal pools.

Burke's goldfields, an endangered species, is now found only in California vernal pools.

Credit: D.D. Ackerly


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (829 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page