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Press Release 12-180

NSF and Mozilla Announce Winning Big Ideas for New Applications on a Faster, Smarter Internet of the Future

Mozilla Ignite names brainstorming round winners and opens development rounds

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Photo of a team of hackers at Hackanooga 2012, Chattanooga's first-ever hackathon.

Hackanooga 2012, Chattanooga's first-ever hackathon, was held on September 14 and 15 2012. Presented by U.S. Ignite and Mozilla, and sponsored by EPB, Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce, the National Science Foundation , CO.LAB, Lamp Post Group and Easy Designs, the 48-hour event connected experienced web developers to Chattanooga's unique one-gigabit-per-second Internet speed. Some 80 hackers hailed across the country and overseas to form teams and leverage the power of the Gig to prototype apps that require high bandwidth or use big data. Potential projects have been identified in areas such as education, clean energy, healthcare and public safety.

Credit: R. Morris / Chattanooga


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Mozilla Foundation Executive Director Mark Surman announces Mozilla Ignite to inspire creativity and app development. He served as a panelist at the administration's US Ignite launch at the White House on June 13, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

ManufacturingHUB.org's George Adams presents an example of how US Ignite sparks innovation in advanced manufacturing. He attended the administration's US Ignite launch at the White House on June 13, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Executive Director of the US Ignite Partnership Sue Spradley describes efforts to inspire next-generation application development. She participated in the administration's US Ignite launch at the White House on June 13, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

GENI Project Director Chip Elliott describes how GENI enables researchers to use so-called slices of the internet to develop new applications. He participated in the administration's US Ignite launch at the White House on June 13, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

UCLA's Deborah Estrin explains how conceptionally US Ignite and GENI foster research that will improve processes with societal impact. She attended the administration's US Ignite launch at the White House on June 13, 2012.

Credit: National Science Foundation