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Press Release 12-205
Stirred Not Mixed: How Seawater Turbulence Affects Marine Food Webs

Movement of seawater affects how marine bacteria absorb organic material

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Image of swirls showing movement in water.

Study provides insight into how small organisms, such as bacteria, interact with their environment.

Credit: John Taylor and Roman Stocker


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Image of foam-like bubbles created by plankton in seawater crashing ashore.

Plankton in seawater crashing ashore create foam-like bubbles known as mermaid's souls.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons


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Close-up image of phytoplankton.

Phytoplankton (shown) are food for zooplankton, in turn the base of the oceanic food web.

Credit: NOAA


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Imahe showing larval fish.

Larval fish are dependent on zooplankton (pictured) as their food source.

Credit: NOAA


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Image showing zooplankton in the ocean.

Zooplankton growth patterns and ocean mixing are major factors in carbon cycling.

Credit: LBL


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Image of the November 2, 2012 cover of Science magazine

The research results are described in the Nov. 2, 2012, issue of the journal Science.

Credit: AAAS copyright 2012


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