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Press Release 13-086
Scientists Discover Oldest Evidence of Split Between Old World Monkeys and Apes

Primate fossils are 25 million years old

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an artist's reconstruction of Rukwapithecus (front, center) and Nsungwepithecus (right).

Artist's reconstruction of Rukwapithecus (front, center) and Nsungwepithecus (right).

Credit: Mauricio Anton


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Look back millions of years at ancient fossils in this video.

Credit: Ohio University/NSF

 

Trees and open land in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania.

A view from the scientists' field site in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania.

Credit: Nancy Stevens


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Photo of paleontologist Nancy Stevens at work in the Rukwa Rift Basin.

Paleontologist Nancy Stevens at work in the Rukwa Rift Basin.

Credit: Verne Simons


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closeup image of a four-wheel-drive vehicle.

Getting to the research area is often a bumpy ride in a four-wheel-drive vehicle.

Credit: Nancy Stevens


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researchers looking at samples in the field

Anatomist Patrick O'Connor conferring with a researcher from the University of Dar es Salaam.

Credit: Nancy Stevens


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Nancy Stevens with Tanzanian geologist Evelyn Mbede survey the field

Nancy Stevens discusses the project with Tanzanian geologist Evelyn Mbede.

Credit: Patrick O'Connor


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