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Press Release 13-194
NSF-funded IceCube Neutrino Observatory provides first indication of high-energy neutrinos from outside the solar system

Findings push neutrinos to the forefront of astronomy

Back to article | Note about images

A graphic representation of the highest energy neutrino ever observed.

This is the highest energy neutrino ever observed, with an estimated energy of 1.14 PeV. It was detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole on January 3, 2012. IceCube physicists named it Ernie.

Credit: IceCube Collaboration


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Group of scientist near the end of the construction of IceCube

Shown here is the deployment of the 86th and final string holding digital optical modules (DOMs) as the construction of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory the world's largest neutrino detector came to a close on Dec. 18, 2010.

Credit: Peter Rejcek, NSF


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Footage of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory beneath Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

Credit: NSF


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