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Press Release 13-126

Long-Buried New Jersey Seawall Spared Coastal Homes From Hurricane Sandy's Wrath

Built in 1882, then hidden by drifting sands, seawall mitigated 2012 hurricane's effects

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Crocked house destroyed in 2012 by Hurricane Sandy in the main breach in Mantoloking, N.J.

Home destroyed in 2012 by Hurricane Sandy, in the main breach in Mantoloking, N.J.

Credit: Patrick Lynett


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Seawall dating to 1882 by the beach in Bay Head, N.J.

Relic seawall dating to 1882 in Bay Head, N.J., was uncovered by Hurricane Sandy.

Credit: Jennifer Irish


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Jennifer Irish measures Hurricane Sandy flood mark along Barnegat Bay, N.J.

Jennifer Irish measures Hurricane Sandy flood mark along Barnegat Bay, N.J.

Credit: Patrick Lynett


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Tow scientists walking on the beach under houses to study erosion from Sandy

Scientists Robert Weiss (left) and Patrick Lynett (right) study more than 10 feet of erosion from Sandy.

Credit: Jennifer Irish


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Houses next to the ocean destroyed by Sandy in Mantoloking, N.J.

Oceanfront homes destroyed by Sandy in Mantoloking, N.J.

Credit: Patrick Lynett


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Scientist with measuring stick checks vertical erosion at the Cupsogue Beach, N.Y.

Robert Weiss checks vertical erosion at the Cupsogue Beach, N.Y., hurricane breach.

Credit: Jennifer Irish


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