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Press Release 13-130
Smartphones Become Even Smarter

The world's 900 million Android devices may now contribute to world-class research and discovery

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Photo illustration showing a hand holding an Android-based smartphone and pulsars in the background

Today, for the first time, owners of Android-based smartphones and tablets can "donate" the surplus computing power of their devices to science; they can reach for the stars and discover new radio pulsars with Einstein@Home on their Android devices.

Credit: Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics/B. Knispel (photo), NASA (pulsar illustration)


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Illustration showing a smartphone and 3-d representations of the AIDS virus.

Another project enabled for Android smartphones and tablets is FightAIDS@Home. The Olson Laboratory at the Scripps Research Institute is using computational methods to identify new candidate drugs that have the right shape and chemical characteristics to block HIV protease, HIV integrase, or HIV reverse transcriptase, the three enzymes that the deadly AIDS virus needs to function and spread.

Credit: Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics


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Photo of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico

Einstein@Home analyzes large amounts of data from the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, the world's largest and most sensitive single-dish radio telescope whose main purpose is to discover radio pulsars, rotating neutron stars that emit beams of electromagnetic radiation.

Credit: NSF


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