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Press Release 13-206
Beyond Mendel

Student DNA Barcoding Project introduces next-generation microbiology to classrooms

Back to article | Note about images

Students in a lab

Students in Dangriga, Belize perform DNA extraction, one step in the DNA barcoding process. The students are identifying the species of fish filets bought at a local market to determine if the filets were mislabeled.

Credit: Marissa Bellino, Biodiversity Center of Belize


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Insect collection

Belizean students collecting insects in Dangriga, a city on the country's southern coast. Sampling local biodiversity--which includes collecting and classifying species in the local ecosystem--is the first part of the Student DNA Barcoding Project curriculum.

Credit: Marissa Bellino, Biodiversity Center of Belize


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Student performing a DNA extraction in a lab

University students performing DNA extraction at a Biodiversity Center of Belize workshop. DNA extraction is one step in the process of DNA barcoding. A relatively recent innovation, DNA barcoding uses a fragment of DNA to identify a species. These students were trying to identify fish species.

Credit: Marissa Bellino, Biodiversity Center of Belize


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students in a field collecting insects

Students take a break from ecological sampling in Dangriga, Belize. The students were participating in a workshop based off the Student DNA Barcoding Project. They investigated their local ecosystem, collecting, classifying and displaying insects.

Credit: Marissa Bellino, Biodiversity Center of Belize.


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (177.1 KB)

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