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Press Release 14-027
White House Champions of Change include educators supported by NSF

Researchers Kimberly Scott and Kevin Clark engage students from underrepresented groups in hands-on work with technology

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student and teacher at computer

CompuGirls combines advanced computational skills learning with key areas of social justice.

Credit: Arizona State University


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screenshot showing a CompuGirls produced application

By providing fun programs where participants learn the latest technologies in digital media, game development and virtual worlds, girls learn skills such as digital media production with photo editing software, documentary filmmaking, game design and simulations with Scratch and virtual world creation with open-sim technology.

Credit: Arizona State University


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Kimberly Scott

Scott saw the need for a program to teach girls advanced technological skills in 2007 when she started CompuGirls.

Credit: Arizona State University


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Professor with students working on a computer

Clark's recent activities have focused on the use of video game design to increase interest in STEM careers; examining pathways and best practices for increasing diversity in STEM disciplines; and issues of diversity in the design and development of educational media products.

Credit: Evan Cantwell, George Mason University


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Kevin Clark

Clark was selected for his innovative approach to creating diversity and access in STEM fields.

Credit: Evan Cantwell, George Mason University


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