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Press Release 14-065
Moving towards a more robust, secure and agile Internet

NSF announces $15 million in awards to develop, deploy and test future Internet architectures

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network architecture

Major design features of the MobilityFirst architecture.

Credit: WINLAB, Rutgers University


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internet architecture

NDN keeps the hourglass-shape of the protocol architecture but changes the narrow waist from naming host/locations to naming data chunks that applications need.

Credit: Jeff Burke, UCLA


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GENI testbed

MobilityFirst deployment on GENI testbed for April 2013 demonstration.

Credit: WINLAB, Rutgers University


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NDN

Validating the NDN architecture design by addressing real application challenges, from live video distribution to vehicular networking to building automation/Internet-of-Things.

Credit: Jeff Burke, UCLA


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XIA supports communication with different types of destination, e.g., hosts, services and content.

XIA supports direct communication with different types of destination, e.g., hosts (red), replicated services (green) and content that can be cached "anywhere" (blue). The set of destination types can evolve over time through the use of fallback addressing: destination addressess can list multiple ways of reaching a destination, including identifiers for new (e.g., content--CID) and well-established (e.g., host--HID) destination types. The use of cryptographic identifiers allows nodes to verify easily that they are communicating with the intended destination. The figure also illustrates the two network deployments planned for XIA: a vehicular network and large scale video streaming. Research on control protocols supporting secure network operations are another focus area for the next phase of XIA.

Credit: Peter Steenkiste, XIA


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