text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation Home National Science Foundation - Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE)
Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE)
design element
SBE Home
About SBE
Funding Opportunities
Awards
News
Events
Discoveries
Publications
Advisory Committee
Career Opportunities
See Additional SBE Resources
View SBE Staff
SBE Organizations
Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS)
National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES)
Social and Economic Sciences (SES)
SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (SMA)
Proposals and Awards
Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  Introduction
Proposal Preparation and Submission
bullet Grant Proposal Guide
  bullet Grants.gov Application Guide
Award and Administration
bullet Award and Administration Guide
Award Conditions
Other Types of Proposals
Merit Review
NSF Outreach
Policy Office
Additional SBE Resources
Exploring What Makes Us Human
Rebuilding the Mosaic Report
Bringing People Into Focus: How Social, Behavioral & Economic Research Addresses National Challenges
"Youth Violence: What We Need to Know" Report to NSF
Social, Behavioral and Economic Research in the Federal Context Report
Expedited Review of Social and Behavioral Research Activities Report
SBE Advisory Committee Web Site (for members only)
Other Site Features
Special Reports
Research Overviews
Multimedia Gallery
Classroom Resources
NSF-Wide Investments

Email this pagePrint this page


Press Release 08-160
NSF, NIH Award Ecology of Infectious Disease Grants

Scientists to study links between environmental changes, spread of infectious diseases

Roosting bats in a village in Bangladesh are connected to an outbreak of Nipah virus there.

Roosting bats in a village in Bangladesh are connected to an outbreak of Nipah virus there.
Credit and Larger Version

September 18, 2008

Unprecedented changes in biodiversity have coincided with the emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases around the world.

To address this problem, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have announced $16 million in funding for eight projects under the Ecology of Infectious Diseases (EID) program, a multi-year, joint-agency effort now in its ninth year of funding.

"In a time of rapid global change, the one certainty is that emerging infectious diseases will be more common," said James Collins, NSF assistant director for biological sciences. "These new EID research awards will support the basic studies needed to predict the timing and severity of the emergence and spread of these diseases."

NSF's contribution to the EID program is from its Directorates for Biological Sciences; Geosciences; and Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences.

Interdisciplinary projects funded through the EID program will study how large-scale environmental events--such as climate change, habitat destruction, biological invasions, pollution and a variety of interventions--alter the risks of viral, parasitic and bacterial diseases in humans and animals.

"Ecological studies of infectious diseases are beginning to move from basic science to translational research," said Joshua Rosenthal, EID program director at NIH's Fogarty International Center. "The results will help us to better manage these diseases."

The studies will contribute knowledge and analytical tools that will help public-health officials, wildlife managers, farmers and others to control the spread of diseases among humans, domestic and wild animals, and crops, say EID scientists.

This year's awards support research on:

  • Bacterial pathogens and human infectious diseases in an estuary subjected to extreme climatic events (Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill);

  • Virulence trade-offs in a vertebrate virus--infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN)--a disease of salmon and trout (Benjamin Kerr, University of Washington);

  • Agricultural antibiotics and human health, using a multi-scale ecological approach to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance (Joseph Eisenberg, University of Michigan);

  • Environmental determinants favorable for the presence and transmission of vibrios, bacteria typically found in saltwater and important human pathogens (Crystal Johnson, University of Southern Mississippi);

  • Eco-epidemiology of West Nile virus emergence in urban areas (Tony Goldberg, University of Wisconsin at Madison);

  • "Immune landscapes" of human influenza in households, towns and cities of southern China (Derek Cummings, Johns Hopkins University);

  • Ecology, emergence and pandemic potential of Nipah virus, a virus harbored in fruit bats, in Bangladesh (Peter Daszak, Consortium for Conservation Medicine at Wildlife Trust);

  • Ecology of anaplasmosis, a tick-borne disease in cattle, and the relationship of disease reservoirs, risk and incidence (Felicia Keesing, Bard College).

The coincidence of broad-scale environmental changes and the emergence of infectious diseases points to underlying and predictable ecological relationships, said Rosenthal.

"The EID program links these components to produce a comprehensive understanding of disease transmission," he said.

Potential benefits of the EID program include development of more advanced disease transmission theory; improved understanding of unintended health effects of development projects; increased capacity to forecast outbreaks; and better comprehension of how diseases emerge and re-emerge.

-NSF-

Media Contacts
Cheryl Dybas, NSF, (703) 292-7734, cdybas@nsf.gov
Ann Puderbaugh, NIH, (301) 402-8614, puderba@mail.nih.gov

Related Websites
NSF Ecology of Infectious Diseases Program: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5269
NIH Ecology of Infectious Diseases Initiative: http://www.fic.nih.gov/programs/research_grants/ecology/
Ecology of Infectious Diseases: An NSF Special Report: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/ecoinf/index.jsp

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, its budget is $7.2 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

 Get News Updates by Email 

Useful NSF Web Sites:
NSF Home Page: http://www.nsf.gov
NSF News: http://www.nsf.gov/news/
For the News Media: http://www.nsf.gov/news/newsroom.jsp
Science and Engineering Statistics: http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/
Awards Searches: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

 

Date-palm gatchers in Bangladesh, who tap trees for sap, may link Nipah virus, bats and humans.
Date-palm gatchers in Bangladesh, who tap trees for sap, may link Nipah virus, bats and humans.
Credit and Larger Version

This army of ticks looking for hosts may carry anaplasmosis, an infectious disease in humans.
This army of ticks looking for hosts may carry anaplasmosis, an infectious disease in humans.
Credit and Larger Version

EID scientists are studying West Nile virus transmission in songbirds.
EID scientists are studying West Nile virus transmission in songbirds.
Credit and Larger Version



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page