text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation Home National Science Foundation - Office of International and Integrative Activities (IIA)
Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)
design element
EPSCoR Home
About EPSCoR
Funding Opportunities
Awards
News
Events
Discoveries
Publications
Career Opportunities
Investment Strategies
Eligibility Criteria
Interagency Coordinating Committee
See Additional EPSCoR Resources
View EPSCoR Staff
IIA Organizations
Integrative Programs and Activities
International Science and Engineering (ISE)
Office of Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)
Proposals and Awards
Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  Introduction
Proposal Preparation and Submission
bullet Grant Proposal Guide
  bullet Grants.gov Application Guide
Award and Administration
bullet Award and Administration Guide
Award Conditions
Other Types of Proposals
Merit Review
NSF Outreach
Policy Office
Additional EPSCoR Resources
EPSCoR RII Eligibility Table FY 2014
EPSCoR Co-Funding Eligibility FY 2014
EPSCoR Outreach Eligibility FY 2014
EPSCoR State Websites
EPSCoR Highlights
Previous Announcements
Other Site Features
Special Reports
Research Overviews
Multimedia Gallery
Classroom Resources
NSF-Wide Investments

Email this pagePrint this page


Press Release 09-019
Could Sea Level Rise to the Steps of the U.S. Capitol?

Even partial melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet would have serious consequences, unevenly felt around the world

satellite image of Antarctica

The continent of Antarctica appears as a bright white mass in a composite satellite image.
Credit and Larger Version

February 5, 2009

View a video interview with University of Toronto professor of geophysics Jerry X. Mitrovica and graduate student Natalya Gomez; and Oregon State University glacial geologist Peter U. Clark.

Global warming raises the specter of melting glaciers and ice sheets at both ends of the globe. The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, roughly the size of Texas, extends over both land and water west of Antarctica's Transantarctic mountains.  Even partial melting of this vast ice sheet would cause a significant rise in sea level.

But that sea level rise would not happen uniformly around the globe, according to an article in Science magazine. The authors show that when physical and gravitational factors are applied to projections of sea level rise, the impact on coastal areas is dramatically worse in some parts of the world than predicted so far.

MORE: Oregon State University Media Release

-NSF-

Media Contacts
Maria C. Zacharias, NSF, (703) 292-8454, mzachari@nsf.gov
David Stauth, Oregon State University, 541-737-0787, david.stauth@oregonstate.edu

Principal Investigators
Peter U. Clark, Oregon State University, 541-737-1247, clarkp@onid.orst.edu
Jerry X. Mitrovica, University of Toronto, 416 978-4946, jxm@physics.utoronto.ca

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, its budget is $7.2 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

 Get News Updates by Email 

Useful NSF Web Sites:
NSF Home Page: http://www.nsf.gov
NSF News: http://www.nsf.gov/news/
For the News Media: http://www.nsf.gov/news/newsroom.jsp
Science and Engineering Statistics: http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/
Awards Searches: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

 

Oregon State University glacial geologist Peter U. Clark.
View Video
Researchers bring a new perspective to climate change and sea-level rise.
Credit and Larger Version

Image of Science magazine cover for Feb. 6, 2009.
Science magazine cover for Feb. 6, 2009
Credit and Larger Version



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page