text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation
News
design element
News
News From the Field
For the News Media
Special Reports
Research Overviews
NSF-Wide Investments
Speeches & Lectures
NSF Current Newsletter
Multimedia Gallery
News Archive
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 

Email this pagePrint this page


Press Release 09-196
National Science Foundation Advisory Committee Offers New Vision for the Geosciences

Releases report: "GEO Vision: Unraveling Earth's Complexities through the Geosciences"

Cover of the NSF's Advisory Committee for Geosciences GEO Vision report.

NSF's Advisory Committee for Geosciences has released a new report: GEO Vision.
Credit and Larger Version

October 15, 2009

Society stands at a crossroads. With growing problems such as resource depletion, energy sustainability, environmental degradation and climate change, can we protect the health of the planet while achieving widespread economic prosperity?

So asks a report released today by the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Advisory Committee for Geosciences (AC-GEO): GEO Vision: Unraveling Earth's Complexities through the Geosciences.

For most of its history Earth has experienced vast alterations, states the report, in response to natural variations in our planet.

Humans, however, are now emerging as the dominant agent of change.

"It is essential going forward that we have the scientific tools and evidence to understand and anticipate how the Earth will be transformed in the future, and at what rate, in response to these growing pressures," says geoscientist George Davis of the University of Arizona, chair of the AC-GEO.

"To identify these influences and their potential impacts requires an understanding of the Earth, its history, and its systems that's grounded in basic science--a science that probes and ultimately defines the Earth's character."

Such basic research is the domain of the geosciences, which seek to advance a better understanding of Earth and its systems, states the GEO Vision report.

In the United States, NSF is the sole research agency, believes the AC-GEO, with the disciplinary breadth to comprehensively address these diverse challenges.

"It is NSF's geosciences directorate that must engage other NSF directorates and external partners in an ambitious research program that furthers our understanding of Earth, and provides the basis for objective and sound policy formulation and decision-making," says Arden L. Bement, Jr., NSF director.

The challenges ahead for the geosciences, the advisory committee found, are:

  • understanding and forecasting the behavior of a complex and evolving Earth system;
  • reducing vulnerability and sustaining life; and
  • growing the geosciences workforce of the future.

The members of the AC-GEO believe that it's possible to meet these challenges, and to realize a GEO Vision of fostering a sustainable future, through a better understanding of our complex and changing planet.

"Earth is a dynamic marvel of complexity and beauty," says Tim Killeen, NSF assistant director for geosciences. "We as geoscientists must work to meet the challenge of understanding its many facets, and use that knowledge to advance our stewardship of its systems. The AC-GEO's report could not be more timely."

Society as a whole must make wise decisions regarding environmental and resource management, according to GEO Vision, using a grounded and rational set of guidelines.

Scientists and engineers will be called upon in the future to supply the scientific insights and predictive capabilities required to inform key policy decisions, many with long-lasting effects.

"Leading many of those discussions will be geoscientists," states the report, "who will share their understanding of the Earth system with the public and with decision-makers, providing the scientific knowledge that will ultimately guide society as it comes to understand its evolving relationship with the planet."

The AC-GEO's recommendations for NSF's directorate for geosciences, which has three divisions--atmospheric and geospace sciences; earth sciences; and ocean sciences--are to:

  • Sustain and nurture fundamental geosciences disciplinary programs;
  • Reach out in bold new directions, engaging and incorporating other disciplines;
  • Embrace a culture that recognizes that transformational research involves an element of risk;
  • Invest wisely and responsibly manage the next generation of tools, technologies, and techniques, including advanced computation to enable cutting-edge research;
  • Communicate the critical role the geosciences play in reducing risks from natural hazards;
  • Build effective and enduring partnerships within NSF as well as with other federal agencies, the private sector, international organizations, and with other institutions outside U.S. borders;
  • Recognize the explicit need for the geosciences to adopt the challenge of increasing the resiliency of natural systems;
  • Build bridges between geoscience researchers and the K-12 classroom to promote early childhood and young-adult understanding of geosciences concepts;
  • Create a broad and diverse cadre of geosciences researchers who can use creative approaches to geosciences education and literacy at all levels;
  • Convey central, and potentially pivotal, geosciences research and findings to policymakers and thought leaders for building a sustainable future.

"We as a society face a daunting task," says Killeen. "Through the help of the AC-GEO, we will make great strides in realizing a new vision for the geosciences--and for the future of our planet."

-NSF-

Media Contacts
Cheryl Dybas, NSF, (703) 292-7734, cdybas@nsf.gov

Related Websites
NSF AC-GEO GEO Vision Report: http://www.nsf.gov/geo/acgeo/geovision/start.jsp
NSF Directorate for Geosciences: http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=GEO

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, its budget is $7.2 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

 Get News Updates by Email 

Useful NSF Web Sites:
NSF Home Page: http://www.nsf.gov
NSF News: http://www.nsf.gov/news/
For the News Media: http://www.nsf.gov/news/newsroom.jsp
Science and Engineering Statistics: http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/
Awards Searches: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

 

Map of Earth's global electrical conductivity.
Geoscientists recently mapped Earth's global electrical conductivity in 3-D for the first time.
Credit and Larger Version

Illustration showing the  interactions between the Sun and the Earth.
Newly uncovered interactions between the Sun and the Earth affect our climate.
Credit and Larger Version

Photo of researcher viewing snow-capped mountains.
Increased desert dust blowing in the wind is altering mountain ecosystems.
Credit and Larger Version

Photo of geoscientists using Doppler-on-Wheels to study tornado formation.
Geoscientists are using instruments like the Doppler-on-Wheels to study tornado formation.
Credit and Larger Version

Photo of ancient fossil leaves.
Ancient fossil leaves tell a story of sudden loss of biodiversity that may have current parallels.
Credit and Larger Version

An aerial view of Long Island shows its low-lying shores, vulnerable to rising sea-levels.
An aerial view of Long Island shows its low-lying shores, vulnerable to rising sea-levels.
Credit and Larger Version

Photo of glacier in background and ice-free areas in foreground.
The history of glaciers in Peru and around the world is under study by geoscientists.
Credit and Larger Version

Photo of the hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus and the mother ship.
The hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus may be tethered or untethered to a mother ship.
Credit and Larger Version

Photo of diver surrounded by jellyfish.
Jellyfish and other small sea creatures drive large-scale mixing in the oceans.
Credit and Larger Version

Artist's rendering showing the solar wind as it streaks by Earth.
This artist's rendering shows the solar wind as it streaks by Earth.
Credit and Larger Version

The locations of the new Ocean Observatories Initiative are shown in this graphic.
The locations of the new Ocean Observatories Initiative are shown in this graphic.
Credit and Larger Version

Map showing seismic stations across the continent.
NSF EarthScope scientists have installed seismic stations across the continent.
Credit and Larger Version



Email this pagePrint this page
Back to Top of page