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News From the Field
Geophysicists Claim Conventional Understanding of Earth's Deep-water Cycle Needs Revision

October 18, 2010

Harry Green A popular view among geophysicists is that large amounts of water are carried from the oceans to the deep mantle in subduction zones--boundaries where the Earth's crustal plates converge, with one plate riding over the other. But now geophysicists, led by the University of California, Riverside's, Harry Green, present results that contradict this view. They compare seismic and experimental evidence to argue that subducting slabs do not carry water deeper than about 400 kilometers. Full Story

Source
University of California, Riverside

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, its budget is $7.2 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

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