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Press Release 11-075
DNA Origami Used to Create 3-D Nanostructures

Image of a nanosphere self-assemble.
Video available View video

Watch a nanosphere self-assemble using the DNA origami technique.
Credit and Larger Version

April 14, 2011

View a video showing the self-assembly of a nanosphere using the DNA origami technique.

Inspired by nature, researchers have started to use the self-assembling feature of DNA to design nanotubes and other objects that have useful electrical and mechanical properties.

As a member of the National Science Foundation’s Materials World Network, Hao Yan and his team at Arizona State University recently developed a new strategy to build nanostructures using DNA as a scaffold for assembly. The research is published in the April 15 issue of the journal Science.

Read the full story from the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University here.

-NSF-

Media Contacts
Lisa Van Pay, NSF, (703) 292-8796, lvanpay@nsf.gov
Richard Harth, Arizona State University, (480) 727-0378, rharth@asu.edu

Program Contacts
David A. Brant, NSF, (703) 292-4941, dbrant@nsf.gov

Principal Investigators
Hao Yan, Arizona State University, (480) 727-8570, hao.yan@asu.edu

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, its budget is $7.2 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

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Cover of the April 15, 2011 issue of the journal Science.
The researchers' findings are described in the April 15, 2011 issue of the journal Science.
Credit and Larger Version



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