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Media Advisory 14-002
Time to cast your vote

Comet ISON photography contest readies for People's Choice 'Ballots'

person looking through a telescope at the sky

People's Choice voting will be open until midnight, Wednesday, Feb. 26.
Credit and Larger Version

February 18, 2014

While Comet ISON's appearance close to planet Earth in late November seemed far too short-lived, astro-photographers worldwide were quick on the draw, capturing spectacular images of this dirty ball of ice as it came into our orbit and before it faced its premature demise.

The National Science Foundation and Astronomy Magazine/Discover Magazine had teamed up to celebrate Comet ISON's arrival, and sponsored a photography contest from October through mid-January. Now that the professional judging is complete, it's time for the People's Choice competition.

Who:Anyone can vote
When: Now through Feb. 26
Where: Online at the voting website. (Voting ends at midnight on Feb. 26.)
How: Just register, and start voting. You can vote for more than one entry!
Why:Ultimately the People's Choice award is worth $1,500 to the winning astro-photographer, so votes do make a difference! Winning images will appear in print in Astronomy magazine and online at Astronomy.com and DiscoverMagazine.com, and on the NSF website in April.


The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, its budget was $7.0 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

-NSF-

Media Contacts
Ivy F. Kupec, NSF, (703) 292-8796, ikupec@nsf.gov

Related Websites
Comet ISON Photography Contest People's Choice Voting: https://ison.skild.com/vote

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. In fiscal year (FY) 2014, its budget is $7.2 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 colleges, universities and other institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 50,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,500 new funding awards. NSF also awards about $593 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

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