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National Science Foundation
  • How Do We Know? Physics, Forcings and Fingerprints

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    How do we know the climate is changing? Is it just part of a natural cycle, or are humans driving the change? Some of the world's leading climate scientists explore these questions, laying out the line of reasoning that has led the International Panel on Climate Change and many other scientific groups to conclude that humans are very likely the cause of the majority of current warming. Glaciologist Richard Alley leads a lively exploration into the fundamentals of climate change and peers into the treasure trove of the deep past to see what might lie ahead in a warmer world.

    Credit: National Science Foundation

  • Behind the Headlines: Scientists and Journalists Talk Climate Change

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    It's a delicate tango: How do reporters tell gripping stories without stretching the science? And how do scientists communicate their findings to the general public? A sustained dialogue is essential, concludes this panel of well-respected climate scientists and journalists. Along the way, they touch on the concurrent challenges facing print journalism, the possibilities of scientist-bloggers, and the urgency of the message they are distributing.

    Credit: National Science Foundation

  • From the Margin to the Mainstream: A Brief History of Climate Change Research

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    In this program, prominent researchers like Eric Barron, director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Stephen Schneider, climatologist at Stanford University, take a look at the progression of climate research throughout history. The first steps toward civilization were taken during a dramatic upheaval in global temperature and weather patterns, and our evolving brains took note. But it wasn't until the development of a true scientific method and observation that the mysteries of the global climate began to present themselves. Since the 19th century, our understanding has grown, and only in the past 25 years have we begun to make great strides towards identifying our role in affecting future changes in global climate.

    Credit: National Science Foundation