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AAAS Fellow Biography

Sarah Miller

Dr. Sarah Miller
AAAS Fellow
Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering
Division of Computer and Network Systems
Class of 2013

Sarah believes that everyone deserves clean water, wherever they live, whatever their means. Trained as an environmental engineer, she invented and patented a bio-based adsorbent to remove arsenic from water. During her doctoral studies at Yale, she conducted research in India, where arsenic contamination of the groundwater has devastated many rural communities. Sarah also believes that every child deserves an excellent education. She has worked in inner-city public schools and in the Admissions Office of Amherst College, where she earned a B.A. in chemistry. As a Teach For America corps member, she taught math and science in East Palo Alto. Most recently, as an administrator, she worked to reinvent one of New Haven’s lowest performing K-8 schools.

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