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SBE 2020: Submission Detail

ID Number: 225
Title: Providing the Web of Social Science Knowledge for the Future: A Network of Social Science Data Collaboratories
Lead Author: Cook, Karen S
Abstract: The evidence base of the social sciences is changing rapidly as we enter a historically unprecedented phase in the production and availability of data and other information about the social, political, and economic world. These new and abundant sources of information hold the promise of enabling social scientists to address the most significant issues facing us as a society -- from governance, health and welfare, to the environment and the economy-- if the information is harnessed appropriately. If we can gear up fast and build the research infrastructure necessary to manage effectively and make accessible the immense infusion of data, successfully provide training to a new generation of scholars who will work with these data, and tackle the substantial privacy and security issues, social science can make more dramatic progress than ever before imagined. No single university or research group is likely to be able to manage all of these tasks, so it is proposed that NSF create a major national resource -- a collaboratory of networked institutions to support a wide-range of activities that would make these tasks manageable, creating a shared resource of unparalleled value to the world of social, behavioral and economic science.
PDF: Cook_Karen_225.pdf

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