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women and minorities
Introduction Chapter 1: Precollege Education Chapter 2: Undergraduate Enrollment Chapter 3: Undergraduate Degrees Chapter 4: Graduate Enrollment Chapter 5: Graduate Degrees Chapter 6: Employment Technical Notes Appendix Tables
Chapter Contents:
Overview
Transition to graduate school
Enrollment trends
Field of study
Enrollment status
Sources of financial support
Debt at graduation
Attrition
References
 
Sidebars
Appendix Tables
List of Figures
Presentation Slides

Graduate Enrollment

Attrition

Factors related to persistence in or attrition from graduate study include integration into the "social and intellectual life of the institution" (Tinto 1993), relationships with faculty advisors (Golde 2000), and the type of financial support received. These factors are interrelated: both those who receive no support and those who receive full fellow-ships are less likely to be integrated into the department's social and intellectual life and are most likely to withdraw (Lovitts and Nelson 2000).

Women and men drop out of S&E graduate programs at approximately the same rates. Among those who enrolled in S&E master's or doctoral programs after completing a baccalaureate in the 1992/93 academic year, about 30 percent of both men and women were no longer enrolled and had not attained any higher degree by 1997. (See appendix table 4-21.) During that time period, similar percentages of men and women (41 and 44 percent, respectively) had completed a higher degree.

The differences between underrepresented minorities on the one hand and Asians and whites on the other in terms of percentages of students who were no longer enrolled and had not attained any higher degree are not statistically significant.

Students with disabilities are more likely than those without to drop out of graduate S&E programs. Among those who enrolled in S&E master's or doctoral programs after completing a baccalaureate in 1992/93, 58 percent of students with disabilities and 29 percent of those without were no longer enrolled and had not attained any higher degree by 1997. (See appendix table 4-21.)



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