nsf.gov - NCSES Asia's Rising Science and Technology Strength: Comparative Indicators for Asia, the European Union, and the United States - US National Science Foundation (NSF)
text-only page produced automatically by LIFT Text
Transcoder Skip all navigation and go to page contentSkip top navigation and go to directorate navigationSkip top navigation and go to page navigation
National Science Foundation National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics
Asia's Rising Science and Technology Strength: Comparative Indicators for Asia, the European Union, and the United States

Technical Notes on Publications Indicators

 

Data on articles are drawn from a growing set of worldwide journals (4,460 in 1988, 5,315 in 2003) tracked by Thomson ISI's Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index and prepared for NSF use by CHI Research, Inc. (now ipIQ, Inc.). Counts, authorship, and citation data encompass articles, notes, and reviews but exclude material whose central purpose is not the presentation or discussion of research findings.

Field classification of articles is based on the journal in which an article appears. Journal classification, based on the pattern of a journal's inward and outward citations, was conducted by CHI Research, Inc. (now ipIQ, Inc.)

Author as used in this discussion means institutional author. Articles are attributed to countries by the researcher's institutional affiliation at the time of publication.

Likewise, coauthorship is institutional coauthorship. An article is considered coauthored only if its authors have different institutional or (if the authors are in the same institution) different departmental affiliations. Multiple author names from the same department of an institution are considered to be one institutional author. The same logic applies to international collaboration.










 
Asia's Rising Science and Technology Strength: Comparative Indicators for Asia, the European Union, and the United States
Special Report| NSF 07-319 | August 2007