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NSF & Congress
NSF - OLPA - Major Legislation - 107th Congress

Excerpt of Senate Report 107-222 to accompany S. 2797, VA/HUD/Independent Agencies FY 2003 Appropriations Regarding National Science Foundation Appropriations

Senate Appropriations Committee

July 25, 2002

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

$4,789,240,0001

Budget estimate, 2003

$5,028,220,000 

Committee recommendation

$5,353,360,000 

1Includes $300,000 in fiscal year 2002 emergency supplemental funding.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The National Science Foundation was established as an independent agency by the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (Public Law 81 507) and is authorized to support research and education programs that promote the progress of science and engineering in the United States. The Foundation supports research and education in all major scientific and engineering disciplines, through grants, contracts, and other forms of assistance awarded to more than 2,000 colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, small businesses, and other organizations in all parts of the United States. The Foundation also supports international programs and unique, large scale, national user research facilities.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,353,360,000 for the National Science Foundation in fiscal year 2003. This represents an increase of $564,120,000 over the fiscal year 2002 level and $325,140,000 more than the budget request. The Committee was guided in its allocation of resources for the Foundation by two central considerations.

First, productivity growth, powered by new knowledge and technological innovation, makes the economic benefits of a comprehensive fundamental research and education enterprise abundantly clear. New products, processes, entire new industries, and the employment opportunities that result, depend upon rapid advances in research and their equally rapid movement into the marketplace. In today's global economy, continued progress in science and engineering and the transfer of the knowledge developed is vital if the United States is to maintain its competitiveness.

In addition, the events of September 11 and subsequent anthrax attacks demonstrate that a nation strong in science and technology can respond rapidly and effectively to crises and changing national circumstances. Fundamental research across the full spectrum of science and engineering disciplines in an appropriately balanced manner, together with the highly skilled workforce that makes research and innovation possible, provides the intellectual capital for the nation to draw upon in times of need. A growing stock of knowledge focused on the frontiers of research increases the options available for response. A diverse, internationally competitive, and globally engaged science and engineering workforce accelerates the development of new technologies to meet unexpected needs.

The Committee reiterates its long standing requirement for reprogramming, initiation of new programs or activities, and reorganizations. The Committee directs the Foundation to notify the chairman and ranking minority member prior to each reprogramming of funds in excess of $250,000 between programs, activities, or elements unless an alternate amount is specified elsewhere by the Committee. The Committee expects to be notified of reprogramming actions which involve less than the above-mentioned amount if such actions would have the effect of changing the agency's funding requirements in future years or if programs or projects specifically cited in the Committee's reports are affected. Finally, the Committee wishes to be consulted regarding reorganizations of offices, programs, and activities prior to the planned implementation of such reorganizations.

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RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

$3,598,640,0001

Budget estimate, 2003

$3,783,210,000 

Committee recommendation

$4,131,630,000  

1Includes $300,000 in fiscal year 2002 emergency supplemental funding.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The research and related activities appropriation addresses the Foundation's three strategic outcomes: people--developing a diverse, internationally competitive and globally-engaged workforce of scientists, engineers, and well-prepared citizens; ideas--enabling discovery across the frontiers of science and engineering, connected to learning, innovation, and service to society; and tools--providing broadly accessible, state-of-the-art information bases and shared research and education tools. Research activities will contribute to the achievement of these outcomes through expansion of the knowledge base; integration of research and education; stimulation of knowledge transfer among academia and the public and private sectors; and bring the perspectives of many disciplines to bear on complex problems important to the Nation. The Foundation's discipline-oriented research programs are: biological sciences; computer and information science and engineering; engineering; geosciences; mathematical and physical sciences; and social, behavioral and economic sciences. Also included are U.S. polar research programs and related logistical support and integrative activities.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee recommends $4,131,630,000 for research and related activities. This amount is $532,990,000 or 15 percent more than the fiscal year 2002 level and $348,420,000 more than the budget request. This funding level is consistent with proposals to double the NSF research budget over 5 years.

The Committee is concerned that the size and number of awards made by the Foundation are far below what is needed to enable our research scientists and engineers to meet the challenges presented by our global competitors. The Committee urges the Foundation, to the maximum extent possible, to use the growth in resources being provided to make a marked and substantial increase in the average award, as well as increase the number of awards being made with special efforts made to include those individuals and institutions not well represented in the Nation's research enterprise.

The Committee's recommendation includes a total of $616,940,000 for computer and information science and engineering. This is $90,000,000 more than the request of which $80,000,000 is for information technology research and $10,000,000 is for the terascale computing systems. Within the additional funds provided for information technology research, the Committee directs NSF to provide $25,000,000 for cyber security research for individual investigators and multidisciplinary research centers and $15,000,000 is for advanced broadband research.

The Nation has become vulnerable to cyber-attacks, in part, because critical aspects of daily life rely on computer systems, networks, and the internet (e.g., water systems and electricity grids). Currently available technologies provide inadequate protection, yet relatively little research is being conducted to develop new approaches to protecting computer systems and networks. The private sector has had little incentive to invest in cyber security because the market emphasizes only speed and convenience. The Federal Government has not filled the gap, but instead has chronically underinvested in cyber security. As a result, what little research has been done on cyber security has been incremental, leaving the basic approaches to cyber security unchanged for decades. As a field with relatively modest support, few researchers, and minimal attention, cyber security fails to attract the interest of students, perpetuating the problems of a lack of trained personnel. Therefore, the Committee is providing $25,000,000 to be used to strengthen support for research in computer and network security. The Committee expects these funds will be used to support both individual investigators and a number of interdisciplinary research centers in computer and network security research.

The universal availability of broadband in the United States will increase productivity, create high-wage jobs, and expand access to healthcare and life-long learning. The Committee believes that the NSF and research community can and should do more to support this national imperative along the lines suggested in the recent National Academy of Sciences report, Broadband: Bringing Home the Bits. In particular, R&D on innovative ``last mile'' technologies (both wired and wireless) could significantly reduce the cost of national broadband deployment, particularly in remote and rural areas. NSF should use the additional $15,000,000 being provided to support research and education activities in this area.

The Committee is aware of the recent report by the NSF's Blue-Ribbon Advisory Committee on Cyber-infrastructure. This advisory Committee called for a significant expansion in high-performance computing, optical networking, software applications for ``e-science,'' and large-scale digital libraries. Such an initiative, if focused around a number of critically important challenges, could accelerate the pace of discovery in all science and engineering disciplines, and serve as a ``multiplier'' for the Government's substantial investment in R&D. The Committee urges NSF to give this careful consideration in developing the fiscal year 2004 proposal.

The Committee's recommendation provides $567,980,000 for engineering. This is $80,000,000 more than the request. These additional funds are to strengthen the nanoscience and engineering initiative in the engineering directorate.

The Committee is providing $1,056,570,000 for the mathematical and physical sciences. The Committee has increased the fiscal year 2003 request for the physics, chemistry, astronomy, materials research and multidisciplinary research subactivities by a total of $135,000,000. The Committee remains concerned that support for the physical sciences has not kept pace with the growth in other disciplines. Yet it is the sustained investment in these disciplines that has enabled the development of today's advanced weapon systems, state-of-the-art medical diagnostic equipment, and improved communications systems. The Committee's recommendation will strengthen the core research and instrumentation programs in these subactivities as well as adequately support the national astronomy centers in West Virginia, New Mexico, and elsewhere, and other NSF physical science facilities. The Committee also directs NSF to provide adequate support for preparatory work for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT). The GSMT was one of the highest priorities recommended in the National Academy of Sciences Astronomy and Astrophysics Committee's decadal survey.

The Committee also encourages NASA and NSF to work together on the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). The LSST was highly recommended in the recent National Academy of Sciences decadal survey and is designed to survey the visible sky to a much fainter level than that reached by existing surveys. It is expected to catalog 90 percent of the near-Earth objects larger than 300 meters and assess the threat they pose to life on Earth. Its ability to find and catalog primitive objects in the Kuiper Belt is expected to significantly aid in the success of NASA's Pluto-Kuiper Belt Explorer mission.

From the additional funds provided for the mathematical and physical sciences directorate, the Committee is adjusting the request by providing an additional $7,300,000 for the national radio astronomy observatories, $4,200,000 for the national optical astronomy observatories, and $14,500,000 for the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center, and other facilities. The Committee's recommendation also includes the $4,000,000 requested for the continuation of the Telescope System Instrumentation Program which was initiated by the Committee in fiscal year 2002.

The Committee is recommending that the mathematical sciences be funded at $162,000,000, an increase of $10,000,000 over the fiscal year 2002 level. With this appropriation, the mathematical sciences will have grown by over 50 percent since fiscal year 2000. Consistent with the NSF budget request, nearly $13,000,000 in additional support for interdisciplinary mathematics is available in the other research and education directorates within the Foundation. The Committee directs NSF to provide a report documenting what has been accomplished as a result of this growth in mathematics research. The report should be submitted to the Committee by January 31, 2003.

Within the request for the biological sciences activity, the Committee is providing $85,000,000 to support ongoing research on the genomics of plants of major economic importance. With this support, researchers will be able to focus on functional genomics, large-scale sequencing, and developing tools and resources for plant genomics studies. Also within the biological sciences activity, the Committee is providing $26,000,000 for biocomplexity research; this represents a 53 percent increase over the comparable fiscal year 2002 level.

The Committee encourages the NSF to continue its participation in the interagency microbial genomics sequencing program, especially as it relates to sequencing of plant pathogens, and to support comparable interagency efforts on sequencing the genomes of domesticated animals. In terms of the plant genome program, the Committee continues to be interested in the sequencing of economically important crops, such as corn, wheat, and barley. Accordingly, the Committee directs the NSF to fund the sequencing of one or more of the crops that are the most economically important to the United States and expects the NSF to complete the sequencing of at least one of the crops by 2004. To accomplish this objective, the Committee expects the Foundation to work with the large-scale sequencing centers involved in sequencing the human genome, the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the Department of Agriculture, and other large-scale sequencing centers to ensure that the funding is utilized in the most cost-effective and timely manner. Finally, the Committee is interested in developing research partnerships supporting plant biotechnology targeted to the needs of the developing world and encourages NSF to work with the U.S. Agency for International Development in creating opportunities for U.S. research institutions to partner with research institutions in a developing country.

The Committee's recommendation provides $684,490,000 for geosciences research. This is $75,020,000 more than the fiscal year 2002 level. The Committee has rejected the Administration's proposal to transfer programs from NOAA, EPA and the USGS. In lieu of the transfer, the Committee is directing that the funds provided be used to augment high priority research activities in the earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences. The Committee supports the efforts being made to develop multi-year strategic plans in the atmospheric sciences and in ocean drilling. As a result, the Committee expects NSF will use $15,000,000 of the increase to augment support for the national user facilities in this directorate and move forward on the integrated ocean drilling program.

The Committee supports the important research being performed at the International Arctic Research Center (IARC). The Committee understands that the cooperative agreement between the Foundation and the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) will expire on April 30, 2003. Accordingly, the Committee urges NSF to work with the Center and the University of Alaska to renew the cooperative agreement.

The Committee provided funds in fiscal year 2001 to begin the design and model testing of a vessel to replace the R/V Alpha Helix. While NSF has made some progress in the design and model testing stages, the Committee is concerned that it may not be developed adequately for its consideration in the fiscal year 2004 budget. The Committee, therefore, urges the Foundation to expedite the completion of the design of the vessel and submit the proposal to the Board for its consideration so that the next phase of construction can go forward in fiscal year 2004.

The Committee has also increased the request for U.S. polar research programs by $10,000,000 to support priority research and infrastructure needs.

As a key part of the Administration's climate change research initiative, the Committee recognizes the Nation needs substantially better information on the current and future state of the ocean and its role in environmental change. Adequate predictive capability is a prerequisite to the development of sound policies at the national and regional level, policies ranging from maritime commerce to public health, from fisheries to safety of life and property, from climate change to national security. The Committee urges NSF to move ahead to support an ocean observatories initiative that is tightly integrated with the Administration's interagency climate change science program.

The Committee supports the fiscal year 2003 budget request for the social, behavioral and economic sciences. Within this amount, the Committee provides $10,000,000 for the children's research initiative.

The Committee is providing an additional $50,000,000 to augment the request for the major research instrumentation program. The Committee reiterates its long-standing concern about the infrastructure needs of developing institutions, historically black colleges and universities; and other minority-serving colleges and universities. The Committee directs NSF to use these additional funds to support the merit-based instrumentation and infrastructure needs of these institutions.

The Committee's recommendation includes an additional $10,000,000 for the innovation partnership program. With these funds, NSF is to support competitive, merit-based partnerships, consisting of States, local and regional entities, industry, academic institutions, and other related organizations for innovation-focused local and regional technology development strategies.

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MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

$138,800,000

Budget estimate, 2003

$126,280,000

Committee recommendation

$79,280,000 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The major research equipment and facilities construction appropriation supports the acquisition, procurement, construction, and commissioning of unique national research platforms, research resources and major research equipment. Projects supported by this appropriation will push the boundaries of technology and will offer significant expansion of opportunities, often in new directions, for the science and engineering community. Preliminary design and development activities, and on-going operations and maintenance costs of the facilities are provided through the research and related activities appropriation account.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee recommends $79,280,000 for major research equipment and facilities construction. Support for the terascale computing systems has been provided in the Research and Related Activities Appropriations Account. Within this account, the Committee's recommendation includes funding for the following projects:

$20,000,000 for Earthscope; $30,000,000 for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array telescope; $9,720,000 for the Large Hadron Collider; $13,560,000 for the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation; and $6,000,000 for South Pole Station.

The Committee remains concerned about the Foundation's management of large scale construction projects and the priority setting process used to select projects to be funded. The Committee received a report from NSF required by Public Law 107 73 which addressed a number of issues of concern to the Committee. However neither the report nor the budget justifications addressed the way in which criteria are used by the agency and the National Science Board in setting priorities among new and potential new starts. A recent audit by the Inspector General identified a number of issues in both the financial management and project management of previously funded projects. In addition, the National Academy of Sciences has recently been asked by the Committee and NSF's authorizing committees to assist in the development of a process for prioritizing projects to be funded out of this account. Accordingly, the Committee directs NSF to provide $750,000 to support the Academy's work on this matter. These funds should be made available from resources used for Planning and Evaluation.

The Committee also supports provisions under consideration by the authorizing committees to establish a more transparent process for the establishment of priorities with respect to the funding of major research equipment and facilities construction. The Committee believes a more open and understandable process, which includes National Science Board and NSB Committee meetings, are important aspects of such a priority setting process.

In addition, despite repeated concerns expressed by the Congress and the Inspector General, NSF has not addressed adequately the management and funding problems associated with large research facilities funded through the major research equipment and facilities construction account (formerly named the major research equipment or MRE account). The Inspector General's May 1, 2002 report found that the lack of adequate guidance ``have allowed NSF to use multiple appropriation accounts to fund the acquisition and construction costs of major research equipment and facilities, and led to inconsistencies in the types of costs funded through the MRE account.'' This practice has led to the use of funds from the research and related activities account to pay for cost overruns and scope increases of large facility projects without adequate notification and consultation with the Committee. Accordingly, the Committee directs NSF to include in its fiscal year 2003 operating plan to the Committee a report that details approved budgeted and actual expenditure information on each individual large research facility projects approved by the Congress. The report should include information on the amount of funds approved by the Congress from its inception by year, the amount of actual funds spent on the project by year, and a breakdown of the budgeted and actual expenditures by appropriation account. In addition, the Committee notes the findings and recommendations contained in the OIG report pertaining to NSF's cost accounting system. As a result, the Committee also directs NSF to address the deficiencies in its cost accounting system to ensure that the system is capable of readily and reliably providing the Foundation and the Committee with information on the actual cost of NSF programs and activities.

The Committee notes that since last year, the Foundation has been recruiting for a Deputy Director for Large Facility Projects. However, NSF has not yet filled this important position. Accordingly, while the Committee has recommended start up funding for the Earthscope project, bill language has been included delaying the obligation of these funds until NSF fills the position of Deputy Director for Large Facility Projects on a permanent basis.

The Committee notes that NSF is proposing to spend $40,000,000 over the next 3 years to develop two National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) sites. The Committee notes that NSF considers this the first phase of NEON. Information on the full NEON concept, including cost estimates, has yet to be provided to the Committee. In the absence of such information, and without prejudice, the Committee is not prepared to recommend funding for NEON at this time.

The Committee urges NSF to continue moving forward with the IceCube Neutrino Detector Observatory. The technology developed by IceCube's precursor project has proven successful at detecting high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. Continued development is expected to lead to a new era in astronomy in which researchers will have unique opportunities to analyze some of the most distant and significant events in the formulation and evolution of the universe.

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EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

$875,000,000

Budget estimate, 2003

$908,080,000

Committee recommendation

$947,730,000

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The education and human resources appropriation supports a comprehensive set of programs across all levels of education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The appropriation supports activities that unite school districts with institutions of higher learning to improve precollege education. Other precollege activities include development of the next generation of precollege STEM education leaders; instructional materials; and the stem instructional workforce. Undergraduate activities support curriculum, laboratory, and instructional improvement; expand the STEM talent pool through scholarships and attracting STEM participants to teaching; augment advanced technological education at 2-year colleges; and develop dissemination tools. Graduate support is directed to research and teaching fellowships and traineeships, and linking precollege systems with higher education to improve the instructional workforce. Programs also seek to broaden the participation of groups underrepresented in the STEM enterprise; build State and regional capacity to compete successfully for research funding; and promote informal science education. Ongoing evaluation efforts and research on learning strengthen the base for these programs. In addition to this appropriation, the Foundation supports private-public K 12 partnerships and undergraduate scholarships in high-need fields through H 1B Nonimmigrant Petitioner Fees provided through Public Law 105 277, as amended.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee has recommended $947,730,000 for this account. This amount is $72,730,000 more than the fiscal year 2002.

The Committee provided $160,000,000 last year to start the new Math and Science Partnership program. It appears that NSF will not be able to obligate all of these funds in fiscal year 2002 and as much as $30,000,000 may be carried over into fiscal year 2003. Therefore the Committee is providing $120,000,000 in new budget authority for this program in fiscal year 2003. Together with the estimated carryover, this will provide up to $150,000,000 for this program in fiscal year 2003.

To support additional K 12 math and science education efforts, the Committee is also providing a total of $223,550,000 for elementary, secondary, and informal science education, of which $37,460,000 is from the H 1B nonimmigrant petitioner fees.

The Committee is aware of the unique and important relationship between historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and their surrounding communities, especially with schools located in some of the nation's most underserved, economically disadvantaged, and isolated areas, and recognizes that there is a natural linkage between school districts with high minority enrollments and HBCUs. The Committee expects the National Science Foundation will take explicit actions to include HBCUs among the set of institutions of higher education participating in its efforts to increase this nation's supply of math and science teachers.

Recent data suggest a number of important trends regarding the development of the Nation's high-tech workforce. Student interest has shifted markedly from the physical sciences and mathematics to the life sciences and computer science. This trend seems to parallel Federal funding trends for research support. In addition, in a number of fields, the percentage of degrees awarded to foreign students has been steadily increasing. At the same time, the demand for jobs requiring technical expertise is growing. Given the demands of our knowledge-based economy, the United States needs to increase the number and diversity of our scientific and technical workforce and facilitate an understanding of basic scientific principles among non-scientists. For this reason, the Committee has focused on a set of NSF programs that relate to education and training at all levels of math and science education.

The Committee has increased the budget request for NSF's graduate and professional education programs by $25,000,000. These additional funds are to be used to increase graduate student stipends in the fellowship programs and the traineeship program to a level of $30,000 per year. The Committee recognizes that graduate stipends in science and engineering need to be made more attractive to students to compensate for the cost of education and mounting student debt, and to offset opportunities for higher salaries offered by employers to science and engineering baccalaureate degree holders.

The Informal Science Education program, which provides support to museums and science centers, is funded at $70,000,000. This represents the first increase in this program in 3 years.

The undergraduate ``tech talent'' expansion program is increased by $20,000,000. The Committee is informed that nearly $70,000,000 was requested by the proposals submitted for the fiscal year 2002 competition in which only $5,000,000 was available. The Committee is also providing an additional $5,000,000 to increase the Advanced Technological Education program. This important NSF program supports undergraduate science education activities at the Nation's community colleges. The Committee strongly encourages NSF to develop a robust and comprehensive plan for undergraduate science and engineering education that builds on the ``tech talent'' program and other NSF undergraduate activities.

The Committee is recommending an increase for the HBCU-Research University Science & Technology (THRUST) initiative within the Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) program of $10,000,000. Eligibility for THRUST should not exclude CREST recipients, but funds provided in fiscal year 2003 should be used to first fully-fund multi-year awards to recipients of THRUST awards in the program's first year.

The Committee does not agree with the budget request to reduce funding for the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation program (LSAMP) or the Historically Black Colleges and Universities--Undergraduate Program (HBCU UP). Both of these programs play important roles in attracting and retaining minorities into science and engineering. In lieu of the reductions proposed by the Administration, the Committee is adding $5,000,000 to LSAMP and $5,000,000 to HBCU UP.

The Committee has included $110,000,000 for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) in this account in order to allow full implementation of the infrastructure awards as well as continuation of other activities. The Committee's recommendation is $35,000,000 more than the budget request and reverses the Administration's proposed $10,000,000 reduction from the fiscal year 2002 level. These funds are necessary due to the increase in program eligibility. In addition, the Committee notes that at least $30,000,000 will be available for EPSCoR activities from the research programs through their share of co-funding.

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SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

$170,040,000

Budget estimate, 2003

$202,950,000

Committee recommendation

$182,160,000

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The salaries and expenses appropriation provides funds for staff salaries, benefits, travel, training, rent, advisory and assistance services, communications and utilities expenses, supplies, equipment, and other operating expenses necessary for management of the agency's research and education activities.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee is providing $182,160,000 for salaries and expenses. This represents an increase of 7 percent over the fiscal year 2002 level. In light of the Committee's rejection of the transfer of programs from NOAA, EPA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, the Committee has not provided the resources requested for the 17 full-time equivalents that had been proposed in connection with the program transfers. The balance of the adjustment to the request should be taken at the Foundation's discretion.

The Committee is supportive of the NSF's need for additional FTEs. From 1990 to 2000, the Foundation's budget doubled while its FTE level declined from 1202 to 1153. However, the Committee notes that little detail regarding the distribution of the additional FTEs was included in the fiscal year 2003 budget request. Therefore, the Committee directs NSF to provide the Committee with a detailed staffing plan for fiscal year 2003 by September 3, 2002.

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NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

. . . . .

Budget estimate, 2003

. . . . .

Committee recommendation

$3,500,000

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The National Science Board is the governing body of the National Science Foundation. The Board is composed of 24 members, appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The Board is charged with serving as adviser to the President and Congress on policy matters related to science and engineering. By law, the Board establishes the policies of the National Science Foundation, providing oversight of its programs and activities, and approval of its strategic directions and budgets. The Board reviews and approves NSF awards, at levels above its delegation of authority to the NSF Director.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee has created a separate account to support the operations and staffing of the National Science Board (NSB). Given the increasing oversight responsibilities of the Board, driven by the growth of the Foundation, the Committee wants to ensure the Board continues to carryout effectively its policy-making and oversight responsibilities. The Committee is providing $3,500,000 to support the operations, activities, expenses, and staffing of the Board. It is the Committee's view that NSB staffing and management decisions are the responsibility and prerogative of the Board. Support for the preparation of Science and Engineering Indicators is provided within the Research and related activities account.

The Committee strongly urges the authorizing committees to provide the Chairman of the National Science Board the permanent authority to hire its own professional staff. The Committee also urges the authorizing committees to consider the merits of having the selection of the Chairman of the Board subject to Senate confirmation to further ensure the independence of the Chairman and the Board.

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OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

 

 

Appropriations, 2002

$7,040,000

Budget estimate, 2003

$7,700,000

Committee recommendation

$9,060,000

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Office of Inspector General appropriation provides audit and investigation functions to identify and correct deficiencies which could create potential instances of fraud, waste, or mismanagement.

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

The Committee is providing $9,060,000 for the Office of Inspector General to support the increasing audit and oversight activities of this office driven by the substantial growth in the size and complexity of NSF research and education programs

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