Skip to main content
Email Print Share
All Images

Discovery

For Better or Worse, Modern Ocean Explorers Stay Connected

Back to article | Note about images

Photo of the view from the driver's seat, or the "bridge," on the R/V Roger Revelle.

Live Internet on the ship helps with navigation, especially in unpredictable environments. Up-to-date ice maps were crucial on a February/March 2007 climate variability research trip down to Antarctica. Here's the view from the driver's seat, or the "bridge," on the R/V Roger Revelle.

Credit: Joe Ferris, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (40 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

R/V Roger Revelle in port in Dunedin, New Zealand, showing antenna atop that provides internet.

The large, balloon-like radome atop the R/V Roger Revelle houses the Seatel antenna, which has brought constant Internet access to the ship since 2002. The antenna sends and receives data at speeds of up to 96/160 kilobits per second (kbps), fast enough for a live webcam session. Here, the ship is in port in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Credit: Pien Huang, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (82 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of R/V Reville on an expedition to Antarctica

The R/V Roger Revelle was the first ship to be connected to HiSeasNet, for constant Internet access, and Roadnet, for distributing data and observations in real-time. The connections enable scientists and crew members to communicate via the Internet from some of the most remote places in the world. This photo, from a February/March 2007 expedition down to Antarctica, was distributed to colleagues, family and friends shortly after it was taken.

Credit: Paul Mauricio, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (45 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.