Skip to main content
Email Print Share

All Images


Discovery

For Better or Worse, Modern Ocean Explorers Stay Connected

Photo of the view from the driver's seat, or the "bridge," on the R/V Roger Revelle.

Live Internet on the ship helps with navigation, especially in unpredictable environments. Up-to-date ice maps were crucial on a February/March 2007 climate variability research trip down to Antarctica. Here's the view from the driver's seat, or the "bridge," on the R/V Roger Revelle.

Credit: Joe Ferris, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (40 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

R/V Roger Revelle in port in Dunedin, New Zealand, showing antenna atop that provides internet.

The large, balloon-like radome atop the R/V Roger Revelle houses the Seatel antenna, which has brought constant Internet access to the ship since 2002. The antenna sends and receives data at speeds of up to 96/160 kilobits per second (kbps), fast enough for a live webcam session. Here, the ship is in port in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Credit: Pien Huang, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (82 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Photo of R/V Reville on an expedition to Antarctica

The R/V Roger Revelle was the first ship to be connected to HiSeasNet, for constant Internet access, and Roadnet, for distributing data and observations in real-time. The connections enable scientists and crew members to communicate via the Internet from some of the most remote places in the world. This photo, from a February/March 2007 expedition down to Antarctica, was distributed to colleagues, family and friends shortly after it was taken.

Credit: Paul Mauricio, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (45 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.