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Offering New HOPE in the Balance Of Security and Civil Liberties

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Data mining technologies and techniques can give law enforcement agencies the edge they need to catch criminals and stop terrorists, but they also raise concerns about respecting personal privacy and civil liberties. New research at Rutgers University has lead to the creation of DI-HOPE-KD, a suite of knowledge discovery tools that integrate powerful data mining tactics will providing guards civil liberties and due process.

Credit: Jupiter Images


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Data mining technologies and techniques can give law enforcement agencies the edge they need to catch criminals and stop terrorists, but they also raise concerns about respecting personal privacy and civil liberties. New research by William M. Pottenger, a research professor of computer science at Rutgers University and CEO of Intuidex, has lead to the creation of DI-HOPE-KD, a suite of knowledge discovery tools that integrate powerful data mining tactics while guarding civil liberties and due process. In this interview, Pottenger discusses the challenges in creating DI-HOPE-KD and describes the safeguards in the technology to protect civil liberties.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Photo of William M. Pottenger, a research professor at Rutgers University and CEO of Intuidex.

William M. Pottenger, a research professor at DIMACS and in the Computer Science Department at Rutgers University and CEO of Intuidex. Pottenger is the principle investigator on a project that developed DI-HOPE-KD, a suite of knowledge discovery tools that use advanced data mining techniques to aide law enforcement agencies while safeguarding civil liberties.

Credit: Courtesy of William M. Pottenger


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