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Discovery
Yellowstone Ecosystem Needs Wolves and Willows, Elk and...Beavers?

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Close up image of a beaver.

The missing link in the Yellowstone ecosystem? The beaver, scientists have found.

Credit: NPS


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Scientists Tom Hobbs, Kristin Marshall and David Cooper study willows and beavers in Yellowstone National Park.

Credit: Colorado State University

 

An old beaver dam along a stream in Yellowstone National Park.

A long-ago beaver dam, a rare sight today, along a stream in Yellowstone National Park.

Credit: NPS


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Map showing locations of the project's experimental sites on Yellowstone's northern range.

Locations of the project's experimental sites on Yellowstone's northern range.

Credit: Kristin Marshall


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Summertime at the team's upstream research site along East Blacktail Deer Creek.

Summertime at the team's upstream research site along East Blacktail Deer Creek.

Credit: Kristin Marshall


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Snow covered East Blacktail Deer Creek

Snow covers East Blacktail Deer Creek in winter. Still, most browsing occurs then.

Credit: Kristin Marshall


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scientist Kristin Marshall measuring the diameters of browsed willow stems.

Using calipers, scientist Kristin Marshall measures the diameters of browsed willow stems.

Credit: Kristin Marshall


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