Skip to main content
Email Print Share

All Images


Discovery

Making graphene work for real-world devices

An illustration of multilayer graphene supported on an amorphous SiO2 substrate.

Pictured is an illustration of multilayer graphene supported on an amorphous SiO2 substrate. Sadeghi et al found that the basal-plane thermal conductivity of the supported multilayer graphene increases with increasing layer thickness and has yet to recover to the graphite value even when the thickness is increased to 34 layers.

The effect is more pronounced at lower temperatures. They attributed the finding to partially diffuse scattering of phonons at the graphene-support interface, especially diffuse transmission of phonons across the interface, as well as long phonon mean free path in graphite even along the cross-plane direction.

Credit: Image courtesy of Jo Wozniak, Texas Advanced Computing Center


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (830.3 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

scanning electron micrograph of a suspended membrane supporting graphene.

False color scanning electron micrograph of a suspended membrane supporting graphene. Red arrows show the direction of the heat flux.

Credit: Li Shi, The University of Texas at Austin


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (1.8 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

phonon scattering

Schematic to model phonon scattering by boundary in a multilayer graphene ribbon where the group velocity and wave vector are not collinear because of the highly anisotropic structure.

Credit: Li Shi, The University of Texas at Austin


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (521.3 KB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.

Li Shi and graduate student, Gabriel Coloyan at a computer exploring germanane.

Li Shi and graduate student Gabriel Coloyan explore germanane, a new material that may be useful for electronic devices or thermoelectric energy conversion devices. In partnership with Josh Goldberger's group at the Ohio State University, Shi's team is exploring the nanoscale characteristics of the material, looking for ways to enhance its thermal and electronic properties.

Credit: Aaron Dubrow, National Science Foundation


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (4.8 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.