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Hibernation season over, will disease-ridden bats emerge from caves and mines this spring?

group of greater mouse-eared bats hanging upside down

Greater mouse-eared bats, European bats that can become infected with White Nose Syndrome.

Credit: Ivan Horacek


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Hibernating bats in the Aeolus Cave in Vermont

Hibernating bats at Aeolus Cave in Vermont before the die-off from White Nose Syndrome.

Credit: Joel Flewelling


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Small groups of bats in 2010 at Aeolus Cave, Vermont;

One year later in 2010 at Aeolus Cave in Vermont, the bats have mostly vanished.

Credit: Joel Flewelling


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A cluster of northern long-eared bats

A cluster of northern long-eared bats. This species has largely disappeared from caves and mines.

Credit: Alan Hicks


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northern long-eared bat infected with white nose syndrome

WNS infects a northern long-eared bat. The species is being considered for protection in the U.S.

Credit: Alan Hicks


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Two little brown bats with white-nose syndrome.

Two little brown bats with white-nose syndrome.

Credit: Alan Hicks


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