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Foamy Invention Could Save Energy and Lives

NSF CAREER awardee Afsaneh Rabiei's ultra-high-strength composite metal foam could revolutionize impact protection

Photo of Afsaneh Rabiei who invented an ultra-strong and lightweight composite metal foam.

Afsaneh Rabiei has invented an ultra-strong and lightweight composite metal foam.
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October 29, 2008

She's fluent in three languages. She's studied everywhere from Tehran to Tokyo to Cambridge, Mass. And she's invented a space-age material so light and strong that it could revolutionize everything from vehicle bumpers to armor to biomedical devices.

The ultra-high-strength composite metal foam created by Afsaneh Rabiei is a highlight of a well-traveled career during which the researcher has tried to learn everything she can about advanced materials. The result: a brand new material that can save energy and lives.

"Basically, it is a new material for all sorts of safety devices," said Rabiei, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at North Carolina State University.

Rabiei's invention isn't the first metal foam, but she says it's the strongest. The main weakness of existing metal foams is the varying sizes of their cells--tiny pockets of space inside the material. Instead, Rabiei used cells of standard sizes and combined them with a metallic matrix to support the cell walls. That helps the foam absorb energy much better than similar materials.

A light, strong material

Rabiei has been working on high-performance materials for more than 20 years. She studied materials science and engineering while getting her undergraduate degree at Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, Iran, in 1986. After spending some time in industry--getting more experience in casting, welding and materials testing--she returned to academia and obtained her Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of Tokyo. Her work on metal foams began when she was a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University.

Along the way, she's become fluent in English, Japanese and Persian, and written four books and dozens of other publications. The National Science Foundation awarded her a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award in 2003. CAREER awards are given to outstanding researchers in science and engineering who are near the beginning of their academic careers and are committed to integrating research and education. Rabiei's goal with the funding was to develop a light, strong material that could be used in saving lives and energy in the aerospace, medical, automotive and other industries.

After five years of work--with a group of her students--she has the results. Rough traffic accident calculations show that by inserting two pieces of her composite metal foam behind the bumper of a car traveling 28 miles per hour (mph), the impact would feel the same to passengers as the impact if they were traveling at only 5 mph.

Applications: airplanes, boats

The results are most striking when the material is tested in a lab. The test itself is exciting: a high-powered machine smashes a piece of steel foam straight down into the base plate of the machine, and then does the same thing with a piece of bulk steel.

When Rabiei examines the base plates under both samples, there's a clear indentation left under the bulk steel sample, while the plate under the foam shows no indentation. The test shows how the foam absorbed the energy and protected the plate, while the steel simply transferred it to the base plate with no protection.

And since the bulk steel is three times heavier than the steel foam, it's easy to see how the foam could attract car manufacturers looking for a bumper that will improve safety and gas mileage.

Rabiei sees plenty of uses for her invention, including in airplanes, boats and structures that need impact protection while maintaining low weight. It's this high strength-to-density ratio--defining a material that's both strong and light--that makes Rabiei's foam unique.

"This material showed a much higher strength-to-density ratio than any metal foam that has ever been reported," she said.

-- Nate DeGraff, North Carolina State University Engineering Communications nate_degraff@ncsu.edu

This Behind the Scenes article was provided to LiveScience in partnership with the National Science Foundation

Investigators
Afsaneh Rabiei

Related Institutions/Organizations
North Carolina State University

Locations
North Carolina

Related Programs
Materials Processing and Manufacturing
International Research and Education in Engineering (IREE)

Related Awards
#0238929 CAREER: Processing and Development of a New Ultra-Light High-Strength Material

Total Grants
$452,250

Related Websites
LiveScience.com: Foamy Invention Could Save Energy and Lives: /news/longurl.cfm?id=143
Science Nation: Inventor Realizes Dream to Create Stronger Metal Foam: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/metalfoam.jsp

Photo of Lakshmi J. Vendra (left) and Judy Brown (right) who help Dr. Rabiei 's research.
Doctoral student Lakshmi J. Vendra (left) and senior Judy Brown (right) help Dr. Rabiei 's research.
Credit and Larger Version



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