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Mathematical Sciences (DMS) Discoveries

NSF's public investment in science, engineering, education and technology helps to create knowledge and sustain prosperity. Read here about the Internet, microbursts, Web browsers, extrasolar planets, and more... a panoply of discoveries and innovations that began with NSF support.

Showing: 1-25 of 25 | Search Discoveries

Illustration showing surfaces of the mouse and human brains From dino brains to thought control--10 fascinating brain findings
Summaries of 10 findings about the brain that involve NSF-funded researchers
Released  February 11, 2014
A neuron activated by light Critical tool for brain research derived from "pond scum"
Basic research serendipitously advances brain science
Released  September 30, 2013
Photo of Joel E. Cohen in class Mathematical Biologist Pushes Frontiers of Knowledge
Corporations, international organizations and other institutions rely on this curiosity-driven researcher to answer societal questions
Released  June 21, 2013
Graphic illustration showing a human head, light and waves Prying Open the Black Box of the Brain
NSF-funded workshop addresses brain structure and function
Released  June 12, 2013
photo of Jill Pipher Math Institute Serves As Bridge for Pure and Applied Mathematics
Best mathematical minds from around the world collaborate on projects with a strong computational component
Released  May 14, 2013
Photo of curve-crease sculpture called Green Balance, created by Erik and Martin Demaine. Computer Scientist Turned Artist
CAREER awardee studies geometric folding algorithms
Released  October 25, 2012
A 3-D computer model of a stent. Scientists Use Math to Build Better Stents
University of Houston mathematician Sunica Canic and her colleagues build computer models to study stents; their simulations could lead to better designs and also help doctors select the right stents for specific procedures
Released  August 26, 2010
Photo of Amy Barnes making phosphorus-rich phosphate glass to use with her doctoral research work. On Earth Day and Everyday, Ecologist Fights for Phosphorus
NSF-supported ecologist James Elser is internationally recognized as an expert on phosphorus in biology and ecology, and his research could help to change societyís views on phosphorus use and conservation
Released  May 6, 2010
Eight thumbnail images and 2008 in Review 2008: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported advances and activities that made news last year
Released  March 13, 2009
Image of a two-dimensional representation of the Klein bottle topology. Klein Bottle is a Real Natural in the Zoo of Geometric Shapes
Discovery could advance understanding of human vision and lead to powerful data compression techniques
Released  October 7, 2008
Photo of a researcher in a lab. Math Could Aid in Curing Cancer
Scientists and medical doctors couple math and medicine for unusual, promising marriage
Released  August 4, 2008
Photo of Jessica Alba and recipients of 2008 A.M.P.A.S Scientific and Technical Achievement Awards. The Man Behind Amazing Movie Simulations
He may not be as famous as Johnny Depp or Jessica Alba, but Oscar-winner Ron Fedkiw creates 3-D models of liquids that have had a major impact on Hollywood and our lives
Released  July 24, 2008
Photo of theoretical mathematician Graeme Milton. Cloaking Device Concept Moves Beyond Theory
Applied mathematician Graeme Milton brings the dream of cloaking devices portrayed in "Star Trek" and "Harry Potter" closer to reality
Released  June 18, 2008
Photo of surgeon Jon Wagner holding plastic casts of fractured jaws. Engineers Create Better Fix for Broken Jaws
Computer finite element modeling program used by University of New Mexico engineers in designing smaller and lighter plates for jaw repair surgery
Released  May 13, 2008
Photo of two men in at a whiteboard Using Abstract Mathematics to Solve Real-World Problems
Researcher's mathematical theory used in new technologies to destroy cancerous tumors
Released  March 5, 2008
2007 In Review 2007: Year in Review
A look back at some of the NSF-supported advances and activities reported last year
Released  January 30, 2008
The E8 root system consists of 240 vectors in an 8-dimensional space. A Mathematical Solution for Another Dimension
New tool could drive breakthroughs in several disciplines
Released  March 19, 2007
Both tropical rainfall and magnetism are described by the math of self-organized criticality. A Link Between Rainfall and Magnetism
They are nothing alike--except for their underlying mathematics
Released  June 29, 2006
A gene chip A Better Algorithm for Detecting Cancer Genes
Process detects known cancer-related genes as well as new ones
Released  May 12, 2006
Silicon-oxygen nanoparticles aggregate to form zeolites. Crystal Sieves, Born Anew
Hard data resolves decades-old mystery of how certain zeolites form
Released  April 17, 2006
Side-by-side images of double-bubbles of equal and unequal volume chambers. Double Soap Bubbles: Proof Positive of Optimal Geometry
What do dish soap, an ancient question, a team of mathematicians and their ingenious proof of the Double Bubble Conjecture have to do with solving 21st century optimization problems? Plenty.
Released  October 7, 2004
Mathematical equations on chalkboard. 350 Years Later, Fermat's Last Theorem Finally Proved
In the 1630s, Pierre de Fermat set a thorny challenge for mathematics with a note scribbled in the margin of a page. More than 350 years later, mathematician Andrew Wiles finally closed the book on Fermat's Last Theorem.
Released  September 21, 2004
icon of a hand and www Detecting Hidden Groups on the Internet
In the free-form clamor of the Internet's discussion groups and other public forums, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute want to listen for the whispers of groups trying to stay hidden.
Released  July 30, 2004
drawing of a triangular faucet opening. Triangles, Not Circles, Make Optimal Faucets
It had long been assumed that circular nozzles, such as those used by ink-jet printers to deposit tiny droplets of ink, were the best shapes for the job. Now, mathematicians at Harvard University have shown that triangular may be the way to go.
Released  July 30, 2004
Approaching wildfire threatens a subdivision Improving Fire Forecasts
Can mathematics help prevent forest fires? Itís not as far-fetched as it sounds. A statistician has combined unprecedented amounts of historical and environmental data to create statistical models that promise more accurate estimates of fire hazards.
Released  July 21, 2004

Showing: 1-25 of 25



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