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Chemical Catalysis  (CAT)


CONTACTS
Name Email Phone Room
Kenneth  Moloy kmoloy@nsf.gov (703) 292-8441  E 9325  
Kevin  Moeller kmoeller@nsf.gov (703) 292-7054  E 9317  
Tarek  Sammakia tsammaki@nsf.gov (703) 292-2170  E 10474  
Tong  Ren tren@nsf.gov Primary: E-mail  Off-Site  


PROGRAM GUIDELINES

Apply to PD 09-6884 as follows:

For full proposals submitted via FastLane: standard NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide proposal preparation guidelines apply.
For full proposals submitted via Grants.gov: the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide: A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Grants.gov Guidelines applies. (Note: The NSF Grants.gov Application Guide is available on the Grants.gov website and on the NSF website at: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=grantsgovguide)

Important Information for Proposers

ATTENTION: Proposers using the Collaborators and Other Affiliations template for more than 10 senior project personnel will encounter proposal print preview issues. Please see the Collaborators and Other Affiliations Information website for updated guidance.

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 17-1), is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 30, 2017. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 17-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.


DUE DATES

Full Proposal Window

    September 1, 2018 - October 1, 2018

    September 1 - September 30, Annually Thereafter

Note that if the last day of a submission window falls on a weekend or official federal government holiday, the deadline is always the following business day, at 5 pm local time.


SYNOPSIS

The Chemical Catalysis Program supports experimental and computational research directed towards the fundamental understanding of the chemistry of catalytic processes.  The CAT Program accepts proposals on catalytic approaches, which facilitate, direct, and accelerate efficient chemical transformations.  The program scope includes the design and synthesis of catalytic species on the molecular, supramolecular, and nanometer scales as well as mechanistic studies primarily focused on discovery, development, or improvement of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic processes.  The CAT Program also considers (but is not limited to) the following: polymerization catalysis, single site catalysis, organocatalysis, inorganic, organometallic, and photoredox catalysis, electrocatalysis, and biologically-inspired catalysis.  Applications of modeling, theory, and simulation to catalytic processes are also relevant.  Fundamental studies of energy-related catalytic processes (such as in water splitting and fuel cells) and photocatalysis (such as in solar energy conversion) are welcome in the CAT Program.

Submissions that address national needs for sustainability are particularly encouraged.  Examples of sustainable chemistry appropriate for the Chemical Catalysis Program include, but are not limited to: the design, preparation and reactivity studies associated with new catalysts and catalytic processes that will replace rare, and/or toxic compounds with earth-abundant and benign alternatives and advanced catalytic methods for the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia that will permit reductions in the energy requirements and greenhouse gas emissions for fertilizer production.

The CAT Program does not support applied catalysis research focusing on engineering aspects of catalysis such as scale-up, processing, transport dynamics, and long-term stability.  Researchers contemplating proposals in these areas are directed to the NSF Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET).  Researchers focused on enzymatic or cellular catalysis should consult the Chemistry of Life Processes (CLP) Program.  Catalysis research with immediate objectives in the synthesis of complex natural products using established catalysts should be submitted to the Chemical Synthesis (SYN) Program.  Finally, research primarily targeted at catalytic reaction mechanisms using known catalysts are most appropriate for submission to the Chemical Structures, Dynamics and Mechanisms–B (CSDM A-B) Program.


What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

Map of Recent Awards Made Through This Program

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