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Elementary Particle Physics - Theory


CONTACTS
Name Email Phone Room
Keith  R. Dienes kdienes@nsf.gov (703) 292-5314  1015 N  


SYNOPSIS

All proposals submitted to the Physics Division that are not governed by another solicitation (such as CAREER) must be submitted to its division-wide solicitation: Division of Physics: Investigator-Initiated Research Projects.

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The Elementary Particle Theory program encompasses different theoretical tools for understanding the interaction of elementary particles at different energy scales. These include String Theory, Quantum Field Theory, Lattice Field Theory, Effective Field Theories, and Phenomenology based on the above theoretical tools. The program supports both formal string theory as well as string-theory-inspired model building.  Proposals in mathematical physics that are relevant for string theory and/or quantum field theory are also relevant for this program.   Predictions for upcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) involve Supersymmetric Model building, Grand Unified Theories, Extra Dimensions, String Inspired phenomenology as well as high order calculations in the Standard Model (of strong weak and electromagnetic interactions) to sort out what new physics might be discovered at the next generation of accelerators and cosmic ray and neutrino detectors. High precision simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) processes using lattice gauge theory are also a crucial ingredient for understanding present and future experiments at various collider facilities. Supported research includes contributions to broad theoretical advances as well as model building and applications to experimental programs at facilities such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Jefferson Laboratory, and to astrophysical phenomena. This includes formulating new approaches for theoretical, computational, and experimental research that explore the fundamental laws of physics and the behavior of physical systems; formulating quantitative hypotheses; exploring and analyzing the implications of such hypotheses analytically and computationally; and interpreting the results of experiments. The effort also includes a considerable number of interdisciplinary grants.

In addition, the program supports infrastructure activities such as short- and long-term visitor programs, workshops, and research centers involving the participation of external scientists from universities, national laboratories, and industry, as well as graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.