Infrastructure Innovation for Biological Research  (IIBR)


FAQ for the Research Resources Solicitations

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for the Directorate of Biological Sciences (BIO) Core Programs Solicitations have been posted. See NSF 18-106 for more information. These FAQ apply to both  Infrastructure Capacity for Biology and the Infrastructure Innovation for Biological Research.

 


CONTACTS
Name Email Phone Room
Steve  Ellis stellis@nsf.gov (703) 292-7876   
Robert  Fleischmann rfleisch@nsf.gov (703) 292-7191   
Jennifer  W. Weller jweller@nsf.gov (703) 292-7121   


PROGRAM GUIDELINES

Solicitation  18-595

Important Information for Proposers

ATTENTION: Proposers using the Collaborators and Other Affiliations template for more than 10 senior project personnel will encounter proposal print preview issues. Please see the Collaborators and Other Affiliations Information website for updated guidance.

A revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 18-1), is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 29, 2018. Please be advised that, depending on the specified due date, the guidelines contained in NSF 18-1 may apply to proposals submitted in response to this funding opportunity.


DUE DATES

Full Proposal Accepted Anytime


SYNOPSIS

The Infrastructure Innovation for Biological Research (IIBR) solicitation supports new and innovative research in biological informatics, instrumentation and associated methods, as well as multidisciplinary approaches to these broad themes that address needs in basic biological research.  These awards support pioneering approaches that develop de novo infrastructure, significantly redesign existing infrastructure, or apply existing infrastructure in novel ways.  Activities must demonstrate the potential to advance or transform research in biology as supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation (http://nsf.gov/bio).

The “Rules of Life” is one of the NSF’s ten big ideas for future investment.  Understanding these basic “Rules” and how they operate across scales of time, space, and complexity to determine how genes function and interact with the environment will enable us to predict the phenotype, structure, function, and behavior of organisms. Providing scientists with the instrumentation and resources necessary to make these discoveries requires investments in new instrumentation capabilities and extending access to existing instrumentation and experimental facilities.   

What Has Been Funded (Recent Awards Made Through This Program, with Abstracts)

Map of Recent Awards Made Through This Program