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South Pole Station at twilight

Twilight is still bright nearly two weeks after sunset at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. The buildings from left are, the Martin A. Pomerantz Observatory (MAPO), the new elevated station, and the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE2) building, a research facility. (NSF/USAP photo by Brien Barnett, Raytheon Polar Services Center.)


Visit the South Pole webcam at http://www.usap.gov/videoClipsAndMaps/spWebCam.cfm.


Amundsen-Scott South Pole Research Projects, 2006-2007


Listed below are projects conducted by U.S. researchers at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during the 2006-2007 austral summer and 2007 winter. The "project description link" provides a brief description of the investigation. Where possible, a link is also provided to the researcher's web site for additional information.

Principal Investigator; Institution

Project Title

Andrew Lange (California Institute of Technology)

Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP): An Experimental Probe of Inflation (ANT 02-30438)

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Mark Engebretson (Augsburg College)

Conjugate Studies of ULF Waves and Magnetospheric Dynamics Using Ground-Based Induction Magnetometers at Four High-Latitude Manned Sites (ANT 02-33169)

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Gonzalo Hernandez (University of Washington)

Austral High-Latitude Atmospheric Dynamics (ANT 02-29251)

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Allan Weatherwax (Siena College)

Studies of the Polar Ionosphere and Magnetosphere from Measurements in Antarctica and Conjugate Regions (ANT 03-38105)

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Allan Weatherwax (Siena College)

Polar Experiment Network for Geospace Upper-Atmosphere Investigations [PENGUIn] - A New Vision for Global Studies (ANT 03-41470)

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John Bieber (University of Delaware, Bartol Research Institute)

Solar and heliospheric studies with antarctic cosmic rays (ANT 00-00315)

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David Besson (University of Kansas)

RICE - Radio Ice Cerenkov Experiment (ANT 05-38108)

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James LaBelle (Dartmouth College)

Direction-finding measurements of LF/MF/HF auroral radio emissions at South Pole (ANT 04-42369)

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Gulamabas Sivjee (Embry Riddle Aeronautical University)

The Antarctic Investigations of Upper Atmospheric Disturbances over the South Pale Station (ANT 03-37618)

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Scott Palo (University of Colorado, Boulder)

High-Latitude Dynamical Studies Using Radar and Satellite Observations (ANT 03-36946)

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Francis Halzen (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

IceCube Neutrino Observatory

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Sarah Church (Stanford University)

Next Generation CMB Polarization Measurements with the QUEST Experiment on DASI (QUAD) (ANT 03-38138)

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John Carlstrom (University of Chicago)

Science Coordination Office for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (SCOARA) (ANT 04-43177)

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John Carlstrom (University of Chicago)

South Pole Observations to Test Cosmological Models: A 10-meter South Pole Telescope (ANT 01-30612)

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Rhett Butler (IRIS: Incorporated Research institutions for Seismology)

SPRESO - Global Seismograph Station at South Pole (ANT 00-04370)

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Anthony Hansen (Magee Scientific Company)

Hyper-insulated Instrumentation System to Support Year-round Research in Polar Regions (ANT 03-37737)

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Fred Eisele (National Center for Atmospheric Research)

Antarctic Tropospheric Chemistry Investigation (ANTCI) (ANT 02-30246)

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Charles Stearns (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Antarctic Meteorological Research Center 2004-2007 (ANT 05-37827)

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Ralph Keeling (Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Changes in Atmospheric Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, and Argon Concentrationsin Relation to the Carbon Cycle and Climate. (ATM 03-30096)

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David Hofmann (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

South Pole Monitoring for Climatic Change - Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory (NSF/NOAA agreement)

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Bruce Johnson (Mayo Clinic)

Altitude Symptoms at the South Pole (ANT 05-40710)

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William Prescott (UNAVCO)

Development of a Power and Communication System for Remote Autonomous GPS and Seismic Stations in Antarctica (ANT 06-19908)

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Sridhar Anandakrishnan (Pennsylvania State University)

Characterizing Lake Amundsen-Scott: A Ground Geophysical Program (ANT 05-38097)

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IceCube Neutrino Observatory

IceCube scientists and engineers installed 480 new deep-ice and 48 new surface Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) (pictured below) during the 2005-6 austral summer at the South Pole. Including the optical modules from previous seasons, over 600 IceCube optical modules and over 660 AMANDA sensors now comprise the current installation of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. Using two drill towers, the IceCube team used a 5 Megawatt enhanced hot water drill (see right column) to drill eight new 2.5 Kilometer-deep holes.

Right: Preparation for drilling ice at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station as part of the IceCube science project. IceCube is a one-cubic-kilometer international high-energy neutrino observatory being built and installed in the clear deep ice below the South Pole Station. (NSF/USAP photo by Albrecht Karle, National Science Foundation.)

For more information on IceCube, visit: http://icecube.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin drillers lower the IceCube drill.
Researchers lower a digital optical module (DOM) into a hole in the ice.

Below: The IceCube drill tower used to drill holes 2.5 km deep in the Antarctic ice at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Optical sensors are then lowered into the holes, comprising the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. (NSF/USAP photo by Spencer Klein, National Science Foundation.)

IceCube drill tower at the South Pole

Above: A Digital Optical Module (DOM) is lowered into a hole in the ice. IceCube will search for neutrinos from distant astrophysical sources, in a quest to answer questions about the origins of the universe. Eighty holes, each 2.4 km deep, will be drilled into the ice. Sixty DOMs will be lowered into each hole and frozen into place. When neutrinos pass through ultra clear blue ice the collision produces a particle – called a muon – that radiates blue light. The DOMs will detect this light and send back data, via the Internet, to scientists around the world. (NSF/USAP photo by Nobuyoshi Kitamura, National Science Foundation.)