Skip to main content
Email Print Share

Impact

Creating bioengineered organs for human transplant

Cell washing technique helps grow organs with patient-derived cells to minimize organ rejection

Cell washing technique may minimize organ rejection.


Cell washing technique may minimize organ rejection.
Credit and Larger Version


November 2, 2017

More than 120,000 people are on the U.S. organ transplant waiting list. Miromatrix Medical, a small business funded by NSF, has developed a technology to create bioengineered organs for human transplant. The cell washing technique gently removes an organ's existing cells, but preserves the organ's structure. This creates a framework to grow a new organ from patient-derived cells, potentially minimizing rejection of the new organ. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Miromatrix's proprietary technique for use in a commercially available, biological mesh for hernia repair. The company's goal is to engineer replacement hearts and other organs. It is currently developing a cardiac patch to repair damage from heart disease.

NSF Directorate(s):
Directorate for Engineering

Locations
Minnesota

Related Awards
#1142525 SBIR Phase I: A Perfusable, Revascularized, Cardiac-Derived Patch for the Treatment of Heart Disease
#1330956 SBIR Phase II: A Perfusable, Revascularized, Cardiac-Derived Patch for the Treatment of Heart Disease

This NSF Impact is one of thousands of research outcomes made possible by NSF that help fuel the U.S. economy, enhance national security and sustain U.S. global leadership by advancing knowledge. You can search for more NSF Impacts at https://www.nsf.gov/impacts.

 Get Impacts by Email