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Frontiers


Frontiers cover, Adaptive Technologies Encourage Independent Learning

Adaptive Technologies Encourage Independent Learning

November/December 1998

FEATURES

Adaptive Technologies Encourage Independent Learning
Cover story: New adaptive technologies provide students with disabilities access to the tools they need to acquire critical skills for independent learning and professional growth.

Computer Interface Helps Deaf-Blind Community
Sidebar: NSF-supported research has led to the design and current development of portable computers that can translate information from the spoken word to Braille.

Rare Coral Reveals Powerful Compound
A tiny, yellow coral called eleutherobia may play an important role in the fight against breast and ovarian cancer.

Astronomical Monuments
Archaeologists have discovered strong evidence of an ancient ceremonial center in southern Egypt, including clay-lined tombs containing cattle and a stone calendar aligned to the summer solstice.

Changing Numbers of Academic Employment of Scientists and Engineers
According to a recent NSF Data Brief, full-time academic employment of science and engineering doctorate holders showed remarkably slow growth in the early 1990s, perhaps due to the wider range of appointment alternatives available to universities today.

NSF IN THE NEWS

Where Bison Graze, Grasslands Thrive
Long-term ecological research has revealed that bison grazing has increased the biodiversity of Kansas grasslands.

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About the cover:
New technologies provide students with disabilities easy access to the tools they need to acquire critical skills for independent learning and professional growth. Above, a student at the Tucker-Maxon Oral School works with "Baldi," the computerized talking head.

Credit: Oregon Institute of Science and Technology/Background images provided by the National Science Foundation


Visit Other Frontiers Issues page   Other Frontiers Issues
Visit Other NSF Publications page   Other NSF Publications
Visit Office of Legislative and Public Affairs page   Office of Legislative and Public Affairs

 

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