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STEM education at UT Austin

Students performing experiments


Students perform classroom experiments that teach science, technology, engineering and mathematics focused content.

More about this image
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) play an increasingly important role in addressing the critical needs of society and generating the innovation that drives the global economy. STEM education faculty at The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) are committed to providing equitable access to STEM careers and literacy for a diverse community of learners for the purpose of building and cultivating interest in STEM topics through innovative and socially responsive research, teaching and teacher preparation informed by the learning sciences.

UT Austin's STEM education degrees prepare elementary teachers through the K-6 certification program and secondary teachers through the nationally recognized UTeach program. UT Austin graduate students return to the classroom and educational organizations in leadership roles and go on to make major contributions in STEM education research and teaching. UT Austin also offers options that are flexible enough for current teachers to extend their knowledge of STEM education. (Date image taken: June 2016; date originally posted to NSF Multimedia Gallery: July 20, 2018)

Credit: Christina S. Murrey, College of Education, University of Texas at Austin
 
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