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December 3, 2009

View Down Boron Nitride Nanotube

A view down the middle of a boron nitride nanotube.

A team led by Vincent Crespi, associate professor of physics, has simulated carbon nanotubes that are smaller and stronger than any other nanotube. Using supercomputers in California, Michigan and Texas to model the electronic states and total energies of various carbon molecules, Crespi and his colleagues discovered a tetrahedral carbon atom that creates tight and stable bonds to form tiny tubes only six atoms across, the smallest diameter theoretically possible. Crespi believes they may prove very useful in nanotechnology applications. (Year of image: 1997) [One of several related images. See Next Image.]

Credit: Vin Crespi, Pennsylvania State Physics. Distributed under the Creative Commons license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/.

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