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News Release 09-191

Ecology of Infectious Disease Grants Awarded by NSF, NIH

Researchers will study links among spread of infectious diseases, global warming and other environmental changes

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Photo showing trapping of rodents that are used to understand leptospirosis transmission.

Trapping and testing rodents is important to understanding transmission of leptospirosis.

Credit: Claudia Munoz-Zanzi


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Photo showing a pathogen in marine snow.

Harmless it's not: marine snow in estuaries and oceans often carries pathogens.

Credit: Maille Lyons


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Photo of a deer.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) affects deer and elk and is related to mad cow disease.

Credit: State of Delaware


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Photo of a blacklegged tick on a one cent piece.

Blacklegged ticks--key carriers of Lyme disease--are tiny menaces.

Credit: Graham Hickling, University of Tennessee-Knoxville


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Photo of Michigan State researchers Sarah Hamer and Chris Neibuhr looking for ticks on a rabbit.

Michigan State University researchers Sarah Hamer and Jean Tsao inspect a wild rabbit for ticks that may be carrying the Lyme disease pathogen.

Credit: Graham Hickling, University of Tennessee-Knoxville


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