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Media Advisory 10-020
Study of Bonobos Offers Clues to What Makes Us Human

How did Homo sapiens come down from the trees, and why did no one follow?

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Duke University anthropologist Brian Hare discusses his work with bonobos and chimpanzees in his Aug. 24, 2010 Distinguished Lecture at the National Science Foundation.

Credit: National Science Foundation

 

Photo of Duke University anthropologist Brian Hare with one of his bonobo subjects.

Duke University anthropologist Brian Hare with Tembo, a juvenile male bonobo, who is scheduled to be released in January back into the wild. This picture was taken because Tembo tried for an early "release," and Hare was trying to help get him back into the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary enclosure.

Credit: Vanessa Woods, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (2.6 MB)

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Bonobos play at the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Credit: Vanessa Woods, Duke University, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University

 

A short video depicting bonobos and their performance in the experiments developed by Duke University anthropologists Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods.

Credit: Vanessa Woods, Duke University, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University

 

Photo of Duke University anthropologist Brian Hare.

Brian Hare, anthropologist and assistant professor in the Department of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy at Duke University.

Credit: Vanessa Woods, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (12 KB)

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Photo of one of Brian Hare's favorite bonobo subjects relaxing at the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary.

Noiki, one of the bonobos Brian Hare has bonded with the most, relaxes at the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in Les Petites Chutes de la Lukaya in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Credit: Vanessa Woods, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University


Download the high-resolution JPG version of the image. (4.1 MB)

Use your mouse to right-click (Mac users may need to Ctrl-click) the link above and choose the option that will save the file or target to your computer.



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